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  #16  
Old 12th April 2014, 10:59 PM
WindGuru WindGuru is offline
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Default Re: Hope for adults with moderate scoliosis?

Hey Mateja, you might want to have a look at this good blog post. It talks about a lot of things you seem concerned about

http://disabledfeminists.com/2009/11...and-scoliosis/
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  #17  
Old 13th April 2014, 12:03 AM
mateja23 mateja23 is offline
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Default Re: Hope for adults with moderate scoliosis?

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Originally Posted by WindGuru View Post
Hey Mateja, you might want to have a look at this good blog post. It talks about a lot of things you seem concerned about

http://disabledfeminists.com/2009/11...and-scoliosis/
I am not concerned about other people's opinion - even if noone ever noticed the assymetry, I'd still want the curve to be gone. One way or the other. (by that I mean that the further I think, the idea of having a "standard fusion" surgery seems more appealing.). Sooner rather than later, so I can completely focus on my studies and work in science. I'm aware of my condition & in constant pain because of it and I want it gone instead of having to do physiotherapy forever. (or any other crappy traditional method that doesn't deal with the underlying cause of the problem).

I'd love to take a picture of my xrays and post them here but unfortunately I don't have them with me - I don't live in my hometown during school semester.

Youre right tonibunny, alll the fusionless methods that I looked up are indeed made for children. But the doctors are certainly looking into ways to apply them to adult population, too. What about the artificial IV discs, can't they be used to straighten the spine whilst preserving flexibility?
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  #18  
Old 13th April 2014, 12:47 AM
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tonibunny tonibunny is offline
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Default Re: Hope for adults with moderate scoliosis?

Replacing all of the IV discs probably wouldn't help much, because the discs themselves aren't causing the scoliosis. Discs can become wedge-shaped after a scoliosis has developed, but they are a symptom rather than the cause of a spinal curve.

Surgeons are usually reluctant to put an artificial disc into a patient with scoliosis; this is because it is thought that the artificial disc would wear out fairly quickly due to the uneven loads on the spine.

I too am hoping that fusionless surgeries become available for kids with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis. Bear in mind that the growth rods available for young children are as restrictive as fusion; they also prevent bending and twisting movements. They are just designed to be lengthened so the child is able to grow. Since growth rods are typically used in kids who have large curves, the goal is usually to allow them to grow as much as possible and then to do a spinal fusion surgery anyway.

Vertebral Body Stapling is different in that it is designed for kids/adolescents with curves of under 40 degrees. These kids do have a chance of avoiding fusion altogether.

Sadly there is currently no way to reduce scoliosis in adults that doesn't involve either surgery or physiotherapy. It would be awesome if there were! If you like going to the gym, we've had reports of success in reducing scoliosis by using a torso rotation machine. I've also heard of adults wearing the Spinecor brace (a soft brace made from bands of elasticated fabric) who have been pleased with the effect on their appearance.
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37 years old, diagnosed with infantile idiopathic scoliosis at 6 months old with curves of 62(T) and 40(L) degrees. Casting and Milwaukee braces until surgery at 10 - ant release/pos fusion T1-T12, halo traction. Post op cast and then TLSO. Further surgery at 18 (ant release/pos fusion extended to L3 to include lumbar curve, costoplasty) and 25 (another costoplasty). Fusion extended to L4 at 33 (XLIF with 4 pedicle screws and two short rods). Pre-op curves: 76(T) and 70(L). Post-op curves: 45(T) and 35(L). Diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome aged 34; scoliosis almost certainly due to this rather than being idiopathic.
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  #19  
Old 16th April 2014, 11:14 PM
mateja23 mateja23 is offline
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Default Re: Hope for adults with moderate scoliosis?

I've read about successful curve reductions in adults following physiotherapy. Various different techniques and exercises were used in studies. While that doesn't seem logical to me (I don't see how an adult's spine that has finished growing can change shape), the results are clearly there. There are many links on the internet so I won't post them here.
What do you guys think about it? Is physiotherapy worth a try? maximum of 10-15 degree reduction can be achieved...it's not nearly perfect but it's something.
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  #20  
Old 17th April 2014, 02:08 PM
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GillyG GillyG is offline
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Default Re: Hope for adults with moderate scoliosis?

Some physiotherapy exercises can help with pain and sometimes some postural improvements can be made, but it can never change the structural aspect of your curve - only surgery can do that I'm afraid.
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  #21  
Old 17th April 2014, 04:44 PM
WindGuru WindGuru is offline
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Default Re: Hope for adults with moderate scoliosis?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mateja23 View Post
I've read about successful curve reductions in adults following physiotherapy. Various different techniques and exercises were used in studies. While that doesn't seem logical to me (I don't see how an adult's spine that has finished growing can change shape), the results are clearly there. There are many links on the internet so I won't post them here.
What do you guys think about it? Is physiotherapy worth a try? maximum of 10-15 degree reduction can be achieved...it's not nearly perfect but it's something.
Hrm... perhaps. I've seen results like that too, and I'd definitely like to be believe them at face value, but the greatest reductions seem to be greatest in people with high curves anyway, which suggests to me that 20% of their apparent big curve is postural (there can be a 5 degree difference in x rays taken on the same day, because of slouching and muscle weakness, etc). So when the muscles are more trained, the postural side of things will even more.

I'd beware of reading what you see at face value. Schroth (physio's bigger brother) seems like a miracle, but none of the patients have been followed up significantly, and the biggest reductions happen in patients that are still growing.

Still, I'd like to believe that physiotherapy could help the appearance, and it can definitely help the pain! I'd say give it a go, though be realistic (a little hope can help though!)
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