Scoliosis Support  

Go Back   Scoliosis Support > Scoliosis > General Discussions

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 2nd October 2011, 08:53 PM
ALZO24 ALZO24 is offline
OrangeD
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 171
Default left or right

Hi I've read something that stated the people with a syrinx are highly likely to have a curve/concave to the left which is unusual as most scoliosis is to the right is this true , what side are your curves.

You see I always thought I was curved right as that's the side of my rib hump / higher shoulder but my mri report states left curve , so is it the view of the consultant rather than your true right hand side or am I wrong in thinking I'm curved that side just because it looks that way
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 2nd October 2011, 11:44 PM
tonibunny's Avatar
tonibunny tonibunny is offline
T Sr: Admin, Big Sister and Da Police!
 
Join Date: Jan 1970
Posts: 15,296
Default Re: left or right

In Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis thoracic curves usually bend to the right (ie with the rib hump at the righthand shoulder) and lumbar curves usually bend to the left. It's not super-rare for someone to have a lefthanded thoracic curve though, and lefthand thoracic curves are actually more common than righthanded ones in Infantile Idiopathic Scoliosis.

If your rib hump is at your righthand shoulder (ie the opposite side to your heart) then you definitely have a right thoracic curve, so perhaps your MRI report is referring to your curve in terms of how the MRI scan came out.


I have a left thoracic/right lumbar curve, but I do have Infantile Idiopathic Scoliosis.
__________________
37 years old, diagnosed with infantile idiopathic scoliosis at 6 months old with curves of 62(T) and 40(L) degrees. Casting and Milwaukee braces until surgery at 10 - ant release/pos fusion T1-T12, halo traction. Post op cast and then TLSO. Further surgery at 18 (ant release/pos fusion extended to L3 to include lumbar curve, costoplasty) and 25 (another costoplasty). Fusion extended to L4 at 33 (XLIF with 4 pedicle screws and two short rods). Pre-op curves: 76(T) and 70(L). Post-op curves: 45(T) and 35(L). Diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome aged 34; scoliosis almost certainly due to this rather than being idiopathic.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 3rd October 2011, 01:22 AM
Mustang Sal's Avatar
Mustang Sal Mustang Sal is offline
Marvellous Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Norwich
Posts: 6,606
Default Re: left or right

I have a left thoracic, right lumbar curves, but mine is congenital (i.e caused by malformed vertebrae) and I think I remember reading that this curve pattern is more common in congenital scoliosis (and infantile idiopathic, as Toni said). It's not unheard of for adolescent idiopathic scoliosis to cause left thoracic curves, it just seems to be less common for some reason.
__________________
I'm Sally, 31, and I have congenital kyphoscoliosis in association with Spina Bifida, Diastematomyelia and tethered cord. Surgery to detether spinal cord and remove bone spur at Addenbrooke's in 1984 aged 3. Developed 'pes cavus' and weakness in legs, various foot surgeries between '92 and '94. Decompression of spinal cord, hemivertebrectomy and fusion L2-L4 with instrumentation by Mr Crawford and Mr Laing (neurosurgeon) in 1998 aged 17. Had two stage anterior-posterior T10 to pelvis fusion surgery on 27th February 2012 at NNUH by Mr Crawford and Mr Lutchman. Fused well but now curving over top of fusion, so facing fusion extension up to T1. Trying a brace first in order to put off surgery til next year
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 3rd October 2011, 08:16 AM
ALZO24 ALZO24 is offline
OrangeD
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 171
Default Re: left or right

HI thanks for the replays

Well its definitely a right curve I have then as I thought !
Have you guys had mri or seen anything written down that stated the opposite side to your curves , what im getting at is this something they do regularly or is it a fundamental mistake on there part with this ,because if it is it doesn't fill me with much confidence with the more positive things they stated.

sorry by the way I forget that a lot of you guys have double s type curves which you would men you have both left and right curves , its the thoracic curve side im trying to evaluate , so if as many of you as possible could state which side this is and if its congenital or not#
thanks
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 3rd October 2011, 11:24 AM
tonibunny's Avatar
tonibunny tonibunny is offline
T Sr: Admin, Big Sister and Da Police!
 
Join Date: Jan 1970
Posts: 15,296
Default Re: left or right

As they've written your thoracic curve is "concave to the left", that is actually the same as it being "convex to the right" which is what you'd expect
__________________
37 years old, diagnosed with infantile idiopathic scoliosis at 6 months old with curves of 62(T) and 40(L) degrees. Casting and Milwaukee braces until surgery at 10 - ant release/pos fusion T1-T12, halo traction. Post op cast and then TLSO. Further surgery at 18 (ant release/pos fusion extended to L3 to include lumbar curve, costoplasty) and 25 (another costoplasty). Fusion extended to L4 at 33 (XLIF with 4 pedicle screws and two short rods). Pre-op curves: 76(T) and 70(L). Post-op curves: 45(T) and 35(L). Diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome aged 34; scoliosis almost certainly due to this rather than being idiopathic.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 3rd October 2011, 10:02 PM
Mustang Sal's Avatar
Mustang Sal Mustang Sal is offline
Marvellous Moderator
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Norwich
Posts: 6,606
Default Re: left or right

In your case, as Toni has just said, I don't think they've made a mistake, they've just worded it differently

I have actually seen some glaring errors on my scan reports and in my medical notes, one example was when they stated i'd had a thoracic fusion (I hadn't - it was quite clear from the images that it's a lumbar fusion!) and that my reported symptoms were in my right leg when it was actually the left. Thankfully those errors haven't jeopardised my care or treatment, but it's still not very reassuring is it!
__________________
I'm Sally, 31, and I have congenital kyphoscoliosis in association with Spina Bifida, Diastematomyelia and tethered cord. Surgery to detether spinal cord and remove bone spur at Addenbrooke's in 1984 aged 3. Developed 'pes cavus' and weakness in legs, various foot surgeries between '92 and '94. Decompression of spinal cord, hemivertebrectomy and fusion L2-L4 with instrumentation by Mr Crawford and Mr Laing (neurosurgeon) in 1998 aged 17. Had two stage anterior-posterior T10 to pelvis fusion surgery on 27th February 2012 at NNUH by Mr Crawford and Mr Lutchman. Fused well but now curving over top of fusion, so facing fusion extension up to T1. Trying a brace first in order to put off surgery til next year
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 4th October 2011, 09:36 AM
titch's Avatar
titch titch is offline
Admin and resident Piskie
 
Join Date: Jan 1970
Location: Weird Wiltshire
Posts: 9,024
Send a message via MSN to titch Send a message via Skype™ to titch
Default Re: left or right

My notes, both those made by very junior doctors and those made by very senior ones, and sometimes even by the same doctor, contradict each other as to how many vertebrae I have*, and thus where my fusion is, and also as to the type of curvature with some stating scoliosis, and others kyphoscoliosis (I guess that is technically correct given that the first surgery fused me in a kyphosis I shouldn't have had mind you).

* I never have figured this out for certain. As I understand it, usually the simplest way of reading an xray is that the lowest set of ribs are on T12, with 5 lumbar vertebrae beneath this. In my case, there are 6 vertebrae below the bottom set of ribs, which leaves the question of do I have 6 lumbar vertebrae, or do I have the normal 5 and am instead missing a set of ribs? Given what I've discussed with a variety of doctors over the years, I'm inclined to go with the missing ribs theory. My body would not be tremendously long even without the curvature, and my sacrum and lumbo-sacral junction appear normal, which they would be less likely to if I had an extra lumbar vertebrae. Also, Mr Webb seemed pretty confident that missing a set of ribs was more common than having excess vertebrae and with all his years of seeing these things, I'd guess he'd know!
__________________
Diagnosed at 15 with 50 curve, but probably juvenile IS. Fused in kyphosis (by non-specialised ortho) with a/p surgery T10-L2 @ 21, posterior only revision surgery to correct kyphosis @ 29. Now 38 with further revision surgery and extension of fusion to sacrum required to correct residual kyphosis, restore lordosis and address spinal stenosis.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 4th October 2011, 10:06 PM
Astra_Sam Astra_Sam is offline
OrangeL
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Bristol
Posts: 297
Default Re: left or right

I have a left lumbar curve and a very slight right thoracic curve (though nothing notable). Mines congenital, along with a lot of other problems.......

Sam, xx
__________________
Currently awaiting my surgery date to correct my kyphoscoliosis and other congenital spinal abnomalies
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 6th October 2011, 05:59 PM
MargaretMBradley's Avatar
MargaretMBradley MargaretMBradley is offline
OrangeL
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: New Lenox, IL USA
Posts: 739
Default Re: left or right

My lumbar curves to the right (C3-4 disc collapse, also the apex with spondylolythesis from the C3-1), back in at the bottom rib (T12) and curves back to the right for the lovely thoracic right rib hump, then goes curving back to the left between my upper shoulder blades (spondylolythesis here, maybe T3-4-5?? apex) and then up to my head which kida sits to the left and my right shoulder, bust, and hip sit lower. It's been called thoracolumbar scoliosis with hyper-kyphosis and lordosis.
__________________
Margaret (43 years old. Thoracolumbar Scoliosis, hyper-kyphosis, cervical hyper-lordosis, flatback, DDD, spondylolithesis, canal stenosis, collapsed, herniated, and perforated discs. Surgery: Dr. DeWald, Chicago Rush University Medical Center, 12/28/2011: Fusion T11-L4. Screws in the L4 became loose and vertebrae slipped backward causing the L3 to sit on L4 at an angle and straightened the normal lordotic curve. Revision surgery 04/12/2013: realign L3-4, installed 2 cages between L3-4 packed with BMP and bone graft, install larger screws and restore normal lordosis.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 10:08 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.1
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
(c) Scoliosis Support