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Thread: Scoliosis and your job

  1. #1
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    As most of you are aware I am a Prison officer and love my job. Today I have been offered a job as a police officer. I will not take the position as my surgery is coming up and i am happy at present however; I mentioned to them i am having back surgery. They instant replied "You would therefore not be able to enter and we withdraw our application" I of course ask for them to explain further. "We are aware of your back condition however any form of treatment will automatically disqualify you from entry."

    I am not fussed however it did annoy me bit. Was surprised that they outright deny entry to those who have received treatment for back issues.

    Fused or unfused, at peak physical fitness do you feel you could not take such a job on? Does your back effect your work now?

    Again, I am now concerned at my medical after surgery i face with the prison. I should be less curios.

  2. #2
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    i think that's a bit harsh that they outright ignore you if you have back issues. surely if a person felt confident in making an application that you know your own limitations and wouldn't apply for such responsibility if you couldn't handle it? hmm. so the police force wouldn't consider someone like me or many others on here who have had surgery in our teens? bizarre.

    i can't really answer your question - i'm still not far along in my journey. i know that at the moment i couldn't do a full time job or one which involves standing all day (plus i'm still not allowed to do heavy lifting) but i don't know how i'll be in the future. i can't see myself feeling restricted and hopefully i'll stay healthy for some time to come.
    Diagnosed in March 2001 by family GP after my mum noticed an asymmetry in my spine. Referred to a consultant at the RNOH, Stanmore and started attending consultations for x-rays twice a year. Prescribed a TLSO brace to be worn 16 hours per day. Began with double major curves at approx 48 degrees. Offered surgery in 2003 aged 16 and declined to continue with school. Requested surgery in 2005 instead. Had T11-L3 fused on 16th July 2005 and haven't looked back! Released for all activities in March 2006, having been driving and riding horses with consultant's permission since 7 weeks post op.

  3. #3
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    Pretty much as i though Becky. I find it discriminating. At our age we should be better of with surgery in theory.

  4. #4
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    i was going to say - isn't it some kind of employment discrimination, but then thought i might have been getting a bit carried away. the police force makes me laugh anyways - it took them ages to realise they were lacking asians because of the height restriction for goodness sake
    Diagnosed in March 2001 by family GP after my mum noticed an asymmetry in my spine. Referred to a consultant at the RNOH, Stanmore and started attending consultations for x-rays twice a year. Prescribed a TLSO brace to be worn 16 hours per day. Began with double major curves at approx 48 degrees. Offered surgery in 2003 aged 16 and declined to continue with school. Requested surgery in 2005 instead. Had T11-L3 fused on 16th July 2005 and haven't looked back! Released for all activities in March 2006, having been driving and riding horses with consultant's permission since 7 weeks post op.

  5. #5
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    No my back does'nt affect my job, i am in and out the car and my feet a lot, i spend a bit of the time in the office and if i'm sat at my desk all day then i do sometimes suffer a bit of ache and pain.

    The only way it has affected is the odd ignorent comment in the office from time to time

    Sorry to hear the way you have beent treated. They must have there reasons, however they could have handled it more diplomaticaly
    Latitude: 54 57' 34" N Longitude: 1 25' 16" W


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  6. #6
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    Becky u are right it is discrimination *thinks of acts* Its a breech of the Disability Discrimination Act 1995 (I think it is 1995) and it is also a breech of another one....the employement act of some kind (will look it up)

    but that is disgraceful phil....just cos u have a back problem and need treatment it doesnt mean that u can't work for them! But I am thinking maybe they meant that they withdraw there application cos you won't be fit to work for them for three months after surgery, therefore it would be better to employ another person. I dunno!
    But that totally sucks!!!

  7. #7
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    eep, the DDA was only updated this year. i remember because we had a load of stuff about it at work.
    Diagnosed in March 2001 by family GP after my mum noticed an asymmetry in my spine. Referred to a consultant at the RNOH, Stanmore and started attending consultations for x-rays twice a year. Prescribed a TLSO brace to be worn 16 hours per day. Began with double major curves at approx 48 degrees. Offered surgery in 2003 aged 16 and declined to continue with school. Requested surgery in 2005 instead. Had T11-L3 fused on 16th July 2005 and haven't looked back! Released for all activities in March 2006, having been driving and riding horses with consultant's permission since 7 weeks post op.

  8. #8
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    hmm, went on policecouldyou website, and it said that they welcome people with disabilities. hence, perhaps it was because of the recovery time and that you would be out of action for a few months, not that you would be unsuitable after you've recovered. if that makes sense. but i dont know.
    xxx

  9. #9
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    Phil, Sorry you were treated so shabby. I would be furious BUT since we own a small business I kindof know why they backed away from you. I wouldn't hire anyone for our shop positions or parts area work if they had any back issues at all. We have been burnt by hiring a temporary worker (Less than I day) and he left because he said he had to pick up his wife. We of course let him go and paid him cash for the work - he immediately went to shyster lawyer and doctor combo and said he had injured his back lifting a piece of junk he was moving. They called workmens comp and the rest is history. I think he had two sureries and the fund ended up paying him something the other side of $25,000.00. Never mind he lied, never mind they didn't consult us first. Now if anyone even looks like they might be less than very healthy and enthusiastic about working we won't hire them just to protect ourselves in the long run.
    I am 61 years old and the resident SSO fossil. I live in Oklahoma,USA with my husband Allen. We have one daughter Jae and she has three kids.Our grandkids are: Aidan is8. He's the one pictured in my current avatar. Jenna Jean is 7 and Ryan Allen is just 4 It's full time chaos here! I was diagnosed in 1965 at 14 years with Kyphoscoliosis and 2 curves measuring 68 and 63 degrees. My last measurements were in 2004 at 155, 88 and 55+ degrees. I have never had surgery or bracing so I now am on full time oxygen and use a Non Invasive Ventilator at night. at night.

  10. #10
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    They won't win any gold medals for tact !
    I checked up the home office requirements for you.(Not bad for an Irish lass)...... http://www.knowledgenetwork.gov.uk/HO/circ...54?OpenDocument
    Basically they're well covered! Naturally,they're not discriminating against you because of your scoliosis, but I presume they feel you'd be a high risk for early retirement on grounds of ill health or at a higher risk for occupational injury.
    As for your prison service job,if you're permanent and pensionable, don't think there's a lot they can do to you.
    Sins
    Scoliosis Support Association Ireland

  11. #11
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    I've never had surgery but I know I've lost out on plenty of job's because of my back. I have difficulty in sitting or standing for very long periods of time and only work part time due to my type of pain.

    After I finished college I was constantly applying for graphic design jobs. If there was a medical section on the application from that mentioned back problems I knew my form would go straight in the bin. Sometimes when I did get an interview and I discussed my condition I could see a change in the interviewer. They never said I didn't get the job because of my back as that would be breaking the law but I always got the same excuses and basic thanks but no thanks letters. I had this for 2 years. Yes, there must have been times when more experienced people were better than me but there were times when I just got a funny feeling from the interview.

    I gave the bookshop a go because it was a part time christmas temp job for 12 weeks, I didn't know if I could do but I was interested in the store and thought I'd try. I never told my manager about my back condition. There was no medical questions on the application form and I was never asked any medical questions in the interview. I loved the job and the part time hours gave me time to rest up if I wasn't feeling too good. I told my manager about my scoloisis after my 12 weeks were up as I was getting a proper contract and I didn't want to have any secrets. He understood my reasons for not telling him and told me honestly that if I had he probably wouldn't have given me the job. As he wouldn't have took the risk. I've been with him for 6 years now and he's said many times that he's glad that I work there. But that's the point sometimes employers see people as risks not what they can do. I'm kinda rambling here, sorry.
    I'm wondering what to read next," Matilda said. "I've finished all the children's books.

  12. #12
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    I think my treatment was pretty radical, and my resulting shape somewhat questionable. But if not for my lung capacity reduction, I don't see why I wouldn't be able to manage the job. I'm small, though... there might be a size requirement. But if I'm tall enough and strong enough and have the endurance to run down a fleeing suspect, then I don't see why fusion should automatically disqualify me.

    After I finished college I was constantly applying for graphic design jobs. If there was a medical section on the application from that mentioned back problems I knew my form would go straight in the bin. Sometimes when I did get an interview and I discussed my condition I could see a change in the interviewer. They never said I didn't get the job because of my back as that would be breaking the law but I always got the same excuses and basic thanks but no thanks letters. I had this for 2 years. Yes, there must have been times when more experienced people were better than me but there were times when I just got a funny feeling from the interview.
    I went through exactly the same thing during and after law school. I sent my resume off to dozens of firms. I got many calls from eager interviewers, and was actually told several times over the phone that my resume was very impressive... I got the feeling that the interview should have been a mere formality in some cases. But when I showed up for the interviews and they got a good look at me, the warm reception turned lukewarm. Like you, I never got told I wasn't being selected because of my shape, but I could tell. You know what I mean. It's a change in the atmosphere of the room.
    congenital scoliosis, thoracic fusion without instrumentation in 1974 (age 11mos), re-operated in 1975 (age 17mo.s) ~ lung volume 25-30%

  13. #13
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    I know that most ppl don't notice that I have scoli, but I am so scareed that after my surgery when I finally get round to getting an equine related job *hopefully* I will be turned down, due to haveing a fused spine. As you guys prolly know, even if you don't know much about horses. They are very big strong animals with a mind of thier own, and need someone with a great deal of strenght occasionally, and the job usually requires alot of heavy lifting too.

  14. #14
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    Legally they are not effected under the discrimination act 1978. They are totally covered. It was more about the lack of tact, narrow mindedness and how any back complaint requiring surgery would stop you joining.

    I was in the mood for picking a fight, hence why i challenged them.

  15. #15
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    Originally posted by marmyte@Oct 19 2005, 07:21 PM
    eep, the DDA was only updated this year. i remember because we had a load of stuff about it at work.
    oh ok....well I learnt about it last year or the year before and I think it was 1995....either that or I didnt listen too well in class! :P

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