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Collette
22nd February 2010, 09:22 PM
Has anyone here had acupuncture for the pain assosiated with spinal disorders?

I had my first visit to the Pain Management clinic at Leicester Royal today and I can tell you, needles in the top of your feet:eek2: but seriously, I'm hopeful that it'll work and even if it doesn't I haven't lost anything as I'm receiving it on the NHS. This is something I wasn't aware of until recently. I suppose it's a postcode lottery but it's worth asking your GP about it if it's something you want to try out.

Mustang Sal
22nd February 2010, 09:45 PM
Hi Collette,

I asked my GP about this because I read that some people experiencing neuropathic pain (which is the sort of pain I get) have reported good results from acupuncture. I was told that because they only have one person at my hospital qualified to do it (and he's leaving soon) they're not really in a position to refer anyone at the moment. Plus they like to get people up to the maximum on a drug like Gabapentin, which is what I take (currently on 2100mg, max is 3600mg), before referring people, which kind of makes sense I guess.

I can't comment on your particular sort of pain as we're all different, but i'm glad you've given it a go! Please let us know how it goes as it's something that really interests me. SHould I ever be brave enough to wind down my Gabapentin dose, I like to think i'd give it a crack :)

carolad
22nd February 2010, 10:09 PM
Oh yes, I've had acupuncture needles stuck in my feet, my hands, my arms, my knees...all for my back pain :)

I have found acupuncture really helpful so I hope you will too. It does seem to depend though - both on how good the person doing the acupuncture is, and on how your body reacts. I've had it from 4 different people (3 physios and one Chinese practitioner) - they have all said that I have a very strong reaction to the needles - apparently not everyone reacts in the same way. I really hope it works for you x

burdle
23rd February 2010, 12:15 PM
Hi,

I am having acupuncture at the moment. I am not a good patient as it takes me ages to allow anyone near my back. At the moment he does the kidney chi ( think that's right) as this is supposed to affect back stuff. He sticks them in my legs and wrist. The guy is completely fascinating- he believes in it totally and says he will get me to a stage when I am calm enough to allow him to do what he really wants to do.

I hope he's right and he can help with the pain but at the moment it is early days. I never thought I would do something like acupuncture though.

tonibunny
23rd February 2010, 12:36 PM
I went to a traditional Chinese medicine place for acupuncture a few years ago. Apparently their technique was very different to the type of acupuncture offered by the NHS, that is endorsed by the British Acupuncture Council. If anyone decides to look at this treatment in the private sector, please do make sure that they are certified by the BAC!

The acupuncture that I had involved having nearly 100 needles put straight into the spasming muscles in my back. It was horribly painful. They left me lying face down in pain for half an hour, during which time they tried to take advantage of my vulnerable state to flog me "specially blended tea" for 60 quid a packet, which was supposedly going to help my back too. The therapist couldn't speak English so he couldn't answer my questions about why it was so painful.

After the treatment I was told that I might be in agony right now but the pain would all get better in a day or two. It didn't.

I was really angry that this sort of place was allowed to exist. I should have known better; before the acupuncture I explained I had infantile idiopathic scoliosis and had had a Harrington Rod implanted when I was 10. I asked if they had ever treated anyone with the same condition and was told that oh yes, they see them all the time. I said ""what, actual cases of infantile scoliosis, where a person has had a spinal curvature since they were a baby?" and was again told yes. No they bl**dy don't, IIS is really rare!

cork_lass
23rd February 2010, 01:38 PM
I went to a traditional Chinese medicine place as well and would not recommend them to anybody. They are just interested in making money and getting as much as they can from their patients and not interested in anything else. I had a very bad experience there but this is not the right place in the forum to talk about this due to our younger members.

I found the acupuncture OK but I did not like all the tea and medicines, they insisted I buy at a cost in total of 300, which made me very sick and they wouldn't refund me when I told them they were not suitable.

I also found that when they did the cupping I was very sore for a few days afterwords, there was one doctor who done a message without even asking me and would not stop when i asked him to. I was very badly bruised and have photos of my back of the bruises.

I will try acupuncture again but I will go to a GP near where I live who is supposed to be brilliant. I will have to wait until I can afford it though as it's about 70 a session.

tonibunny
23rd February 2010, 02:16 PM
I tried acupuncture because my friend R. had tried it (with a BAC registered therapist) for a shoulder problem and was amazed at the results. It sounds so totally different to the treatment I had - they put the pins in his hands, not directly into his shoulder, and he could barely feel them go in.

I'd definitely give it another try with a proper registered therapist.

Ellie
23rd February 2010, 08:11 PM
Quite a few years ago I had acupuncture done privately (by a GP who offered it free to his own patients) He was properly qualified and had studied with my own GP.
Anyway the needles were inserted in various positions all over my back and down to my knees. There was no pain or blood involved.
The first time I had pin prick marks all over and I felt a rather strange sensation of warmth in those sites (made me think that maybe the Chi line stuff made sense).
Anyway, I would not say it was a miraculous cure. (My original concern (apart from the Scoliosis), was the worry over all the drugs and the side effects I was having (drugs to counteract drugs etc)). What it did do was make me relax and eventually I was able to reduce the amount of drugs, until I was lucky enough to be free of them for quite a while (I did realise that it would not be a permanent arrangement) The treatment went on for about 6 weeks, then I was on my own, it took about 18 months for me to wean myself off the drugs. I think/know it was partly a dependancy issue.
I do not think that it is for everyone. In fact at the time I was extremely sceptical as to its merits. But as with a lot of us I was desperate :)
Hope this makes some sense as I am once again in a drugged up state :) and feeling a bit woozy!

spiritofbamboo
13th May 2010, 12:16 AM
Has anyone here had acupuncture for the pain assosiated with spinal disorders?

I had my first visit to the Pain Management clinic at Leicester Royal today and I can tell you, needles in the top of your feet:eek2: but seriously, I'm hopeful that it'll work and even if it doesn't I haven't lost anything as I'm receiving it on the NHS. This is something I wasn't aware of until recently. I suppose it's a postcode lottery but it's worth asking your GP about it if it's something you want to try out.

Hi, I am an acupuncturist in CA. I combine needle treatments with Craniosacral therapy and Myofascial Release. Generally, I start out with distal points that specifically treat the spine. After some time, I will needle the muscles along the spine at the junctions of rotational changes. It seems to me that the strong pain is related to the congestion of Qi (energy) in the area and the binding of the muscles and fascial tissue. However, I find that my client with more involved scoliosis feels much better, & the spine is straighter after the treatment. So she is willing to put up with the pain. Some points are less tender. The points on the hand can be pinchy, and the others are less so.

When I do cranial work, she feels the changes in the head in her spine and when I work on her spine she feel it in her head. (There is a connection and an explanation.) I have also affected changes in the spinal musculature from working her calves at specifics points that are related to the painful areas in the back.

I know it sounds kooky, but it really isn't when you at least think about the connective tissue and how everything in the body is embedded in the continuous web/matrix.

bluestone
13th May 2010, 09:42 AM
I had some acupuncture on the NHS at our local clinc and for a while it did seem to work, she especially helped with my neck pain.
I had needles in my spine, elbows (to help my arm pains) and neck.I hated the needles been put between my thumbs and finger-in the soft bit-ugh!
I wonder though how qualified she was as she did sometimes draw blood into this bit and it hurt!

I stopped having it after a few weeks because I felt it just wasnt helping anymore and I has started to dread it.

Im thinking a private registered acupuncture would probably be worth trying as I dont think NHS ones are qualified enough.

carolad
13th May 2010, 10:44 AM
Hi, I am an acupuncturist in CA. I combine needle treatments with Craniosacral therapy and Myofascial Release. Generally, I start out with distal points that specifically treat the spine. After some time, I will needle the muscles along the spine at the junctions of rotational changes. It seems to me that the strong pain is related to the congestion of Qi (energy) in the area and the binding of the muscles and fascial tissue. However, I find that my client with more involved scoliosis feels much better, & the spine is straighter after the treatment. So she is willing to put up with the pain. Some points are less tender. The points on the hand can be pinchy, and the others are less so.

When I do cranial work, she feels the changes in the head in her spine and when I work on her spine she feel it in her head. (There is a connection and an explanation.) I have also affected changes in the spinal musculature from working her calves at specifics points that are related to the painful areas in the back.

I know it sounds kooky, but it really isn't when you at least think about the connective tissue and how everything in the body is embedded in the continuous web/matrix.

Thats really interesting - that sounds very similar to what my physio does! I agree it sounds 'kooky' and I was very sceptical...but I always feel SO much better after my physio sessions, so thats the proof that it works for me! I've found that the craniosacral therapy also makes me feel incredibly relaxed and a bit 'spaced out' - a very odd feeling! I have no idea what is going on physiologically, but I don't really care as long as it makes me feel better :D

Collette
13th May 2010, 09:45 PM
:welcome: spirit of bamboo...interesting name!

I was offered 4 treatments (on the NHS) at the end of which they usually review your case and then possibly offer more treatments, however the nurse who performed the acupuncture suggested that she taught me how to do it for myself! I accepted although I don't think I could bring myself to stick pins in me:eek:.
But as it's turned out I had to cancel my appointments due to my surgery coming up, so I'll have to wait and see what they offer when I've recovered.

I only ever had needles (or sharps as they call them) placed into my hands, feet and calves. It didn't seem to be doing much for me though, so I think maybe you're right Sarah.

mark
13th May 2010, 09:54 PM
I think it i sreally progressive of the nhs to offer this form of treatment. I really hope that AT and others are accepted as an acceptable and affordable treatment. If it was not for the likes of these treatments a whole swathe of people would be living miserable painful lives

Keep it up NHS

Take care

mark

Collette
13th May 2010, 10:08 PM
I think it i sreally progressive of the nhs to offer this form of treatment. I really hope that AT and others are accepted as an acceptable and affordable treatment. If it was not for the likes of these treatments a whole swathe of people would be living miserable painful lives

Keep it up NHS

Take care

mark

Too right Mark!

I hope they start offering more alternative therapies on the NHS as I think it only fair that they are made availiable to those who may not be able to afford to seek private treatment and I'm a great believer in and user of them.
I don't understand how some people with no experience of such therapies can be so dismissive of them though? I mean there are so many success stories and they've been around for thousands of years!

mark
13th May 2010, 10:12 PM
Yes i agree with you

Health care should be affordable to all