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burdle
9th February 2010, 02:26 PM
I am in regular nasty pain which is getting me very down. I can't see a way out these days but I don't understand why the pain is getting so much worse so quickly. I have had x rays done recently which I have looked at ( and no-one else) and I don't think that my curve has increased drastically although I could be seeing what I want to see. Does anyone have any experience or can point me to some research on the effect of the menopause on the progression of scoliosis?

GillyG
9th February 2010, 05:17 PM
Try typing 'menopause and scoliosis' (or the other way round :p) and have a read up on the subject, you'll get loads of hits.

Realistically, menopause can weaken the bones (due to osteoporosis) so it would make sense to me that we suffer more problems as time goes on. I coped fine with my progressing scoliosis until I hit my mid 40's and then it all kind of went to pot :p

burdle
9th February 2010, 06:01 PM
Try typing 'menopause and scoliosis' (or the other way round :p) and have a read up on the subject, you'll get loads of hits.

Realistically, menopause can weaken the bones (due to osteoporosis) so it would make sense to me that we suffer more problems as time goes on. I coped fine with my progressing scoliosis until I hit my mid 40's and then it all kind of went to pot :p


Thanks Gilly, but there is not much useful stuff about. Most of it seems to suggest that scoliosis can develop during menopause so presumably this is structural. I am really after finding out if the curve progression has an extra spurt during menopause as it does during puberty. It has been suggested to me that my curve progression may not have stopped just because I think it has as I have not yet gome thru the menopause

bluestone
9th February 2010, 09:31 PM
I was also worried about curve progression in menopause if I didnt do something about my curve now-im 44.

I feel that I coped fairly okay (although I was in a lot of pain) until I hit 40 and I feel that I went down hill, I was right as I had progressed to 72 degrees when I thought it was 60.

If I dont have surgery this year my consultant said it will progress quite quickly, whether this is due to my age I dont know.

It would be best to have your curve measured as you really cant tell by looking at an x-ray.I had a consultant do this to me once and he said my curve hadnt progressed, when it was measured by another consultant 6mths later it had-a lot.

Cassie
9th February 2010, 10:59 PM
My problems hit again in my 40's - wear and tear over the years I guess! I was worried about menopause on my curve too, so when I got a bit older I had a Dexa scan to check my bone density as I was told that would matter if they were hoping to place rods and screws. (It was ok)
But as Gilly said osteoporosis can be one of the conditions associated with menopause.

I had a 'Google' and there isn't a huge amount of useful info out there unless I'm choosing the wrong bits to read! :)

Amazed Jean
10th February 2010, 12:42 AM
I cannot honestly say if menopause made my scoliosis worse. I didn't notice any change in my spine but I did have Hot Flashes that were a precusor to hell and Night sweats - very sexy if you are into wet sheets and smelly body. My skin thinned out and I got my mothers skin in a weeks time. I beleive it's called orange peel or something distasteful. I itch all the time so I slather on body cream everyday right after my shower. Now I am getting some pale brownish spots here and about. I may not have noticed any spine change. I did live through menopause. Now that it's paused what?

Lucy7
11th February 2010, 04:50 PM
I am in regular nasty pain which is getting me very down. I can't see a way out these days but I don't understand why the pain is getting so much worse so quickly. I have had x rays done recently which I have looked at ( and no-one else) and I don't think that my curve has increased drastically although I could be seeing what I want to see. Does anyone have any experience or can point me to some research on the effect of the menopause on the progression of scoliosis?

So sorry to hear you are feeling so miserable. I am nearly 40 but have already had problems last year with hormone imbalance. I found my scoliosis a lot more painful at the time also. I was found to be slightly estrogen dominant which is often the case with many women, especially during the menopause. New studies are showing that giving women high doses of that hormone (which was so popular in the 70's and 80's) is like putting petrol on a fire.

When I saw a pain specialist last year I happened to mention about my slight estrogen dominance. I am so glad I did because he said that it made a big difference to my level of pain. He explained that during pregnancy (when estrogen is high) ligaments and joints get looser. When you are estrogen dominant, because your hormones are slighly out of whack, then the same loosening of the joints and ligaments occurs.

So I suppose the solution really lies in getting your hormones balanced. This is a great book to read about balancing hormones and general health concerns during The Pause !
http://www.amazon.com/What-Your-Doctor-About-Menopause/dp/0446614955/ref=pd_bxgy_b_img_c


:squeeze::squeeze:

Gently hugs,
Lucy xx

Ellie
23rd February 2010, 08:24 PM
I will turn 52 this week and have been having problems with a bit of progression and more pain. I am currently seeing a physio who has confirmed that the general age wear and tear combined with the scoliosis will have that effect. Sorry ladies.
There seem to be a few of us around my age who either opted or were not offered treatment in their youth who, having managed all these years are now seeking some sort of information and end up on sites like this. Unlike our predecessors not happy to just sit back and let it happen to us.
If we can pool as much information as possible and compare approaches we may find something to help.
ps can you tell I am on a mission at the moment :)

Ellie
23rd February 2010, 08:27 PM
on that note has anyone else noticed a weight gain prior to the pain onset?
I have put on a bit of weight in the last twelve months and am thinking that I may not be helping myself.
Trying to be good but it is not working :) Really must do better!

Lucy7
24th February 2010, 02:29 AM
Ellie, I did have a fair amount of weight gain (ha! that's a major understatement!) with my divorce and it certainly did make my pain a lot worse. However, now I have lost most of the weight but sadly the pain is still bad :(. Schroth really helped me with pain at first but it has got really nasty again in the last 2 months.......

BTW grrrr to aging and wear and tear!!!!!

Ellie
24th February 2010, 09:36 AM
BTW grrrr to aging and wear and tear!!!!!

I have fought against this one for a few years and refuse to admit it in the main. I am lucky to come from a family of long lived energetic ladies, my gran was 92 and until a year before her death she was quite active. My Great Aunt is 89 this year and until last year was a feisty, nothing will get me down type and my mother well she is 78 and despite a bit of a heart problem lives over a thousand miles from us all and is trying to organise everyone, from the govenrment down! She takes walks in the mountains that would make most of us shudder.
Although when I am with her she asks for chairs in shops (which I am grateful for) and when they offer them to her she just smiles.

bara
25th February 2010, 12:22 AM
40 years post surgery, peri-menopausal, relatively symptom free ... but definitely getting the weight gain!

:o)

B

Kazzimo
25th February 2010, 10:26 AM
Hello all,
this is a very interesting thread which I have only just come across, apologies for the delay. If you have any advice for me then it will be gladly received! I am 42 and went through the menopause just over a year and half ago. This is probably a youngish age for menopause, but runs in my family (my mother was 33!). I had never thought to associate my increased back pain with this before. I have opted to have surgery as my back is changing and I believe will continue to do so. I have tried HRT but I gained 3/4 stone in a week! My GP said I could be allergic to the estrogen hormone?? Also I experienced other pains and problems which my doctor couldn't decide whether they were to do with my back or the HRT! What should I do? I have tried HRT twice and both times felt unwell after a certain amount of time, or was it coincidence. I feel now, however, that my body is ageing rapidly and wonder if there is anything safe that I could take prior to surgery as my GP has said HRT could cause DVT? If I am estrogen allergic then is there another hormone that could help instead? I don't feel that my GP is that concerned about the effects of the menopause on my body but I know from an orthopeadic viewpoint I should be taking something. I was considering looking at natural or homeopathic products but would this be a waste of money? Your thoughts would be appreciated. Kaz xx

titch
25th February 2010, 02:56 PM
Look into plant oestrogens, such as soya has a fairly high amount I believe. It might also be worth some research on HRT, if you can remember what type(s) you took - some people can only tolerate certain ones, I'm sure it used to be something to do in many cases with the source of the hormone, however that could well have changed by now as the tech changes all the time of course.

But other than that, really if it's bone health you're mostly concerned with, there are other things which can be done to help preserve that. Fosamax is the only drug name I can bring to mind, but there are now several options for preserving and increasing bone density, the important thing being to have a periodic assessment of your bone density to determine whether it's needed.

Something I would note regarding bone density assessment, is that although you've not had the surgery yet, if they assess it based on a spine xray, this is likely to be inaccurate - the fact that our spines are curved, and this shortens them, means we get a higher reading than we should, if that makes sense, so it should always be supported by an additional reading (I believe the wrist is often used) to ensure that the density really is as good as it appears to be.

Lucy7
25th February 2010, 03:32 PM
Kazzimo,

I would try and find a gyno that works with Biodentical Hormones. I myself am trying to do the same. You may be interested to add that topic to your research.

Take care,
Lucy

titch
25th February 2010, 06:48 PM
Ah! That's it - exactly what I was inanely wittering about, bio-identical hormones :)

Kazzimo
26th February 2010, 10:33 AM
Thank you for your replies. I was wondering though, if I am allergic or intolerant to the estrogen in HRT, would plant extracts that mimic estrogen also have the same effect on me or not? I have been considering soya based products but was unsure. My ortho said my bones looked in good condition, although I have never had a bone scan only an MRI scan and xrays. I'm primarily concerned about my bones as my mother has osteoporosis, but also thinning of the skin. In addition, I do not want my hair to thin, etc. Its been about a year and half now since things ceased completely, so to speak, so do you think I should leave it until after my operation or should I be concerned right now about replacement therapy?? Its a very complicated subject. Some reports say progesterone cream would help in some respects and others say it doesn't. Kaz xx

titch
26th February 2010, 05:57 PM
I think with the combination of issues, you've got good argument for being referred to a specialist for this, the question being what sort. I'm wondering whether it should be an endocrinologist, but I'm not sure - perhaps what would be best would be if your GP can find you a clinic which is broadly devoted to early menopause, rather than an individual who will be dealing with one aspect (although an endo should have a good broad view on things). Sorry, that's really not a lot of use :(

nutmeg
27th February 2010, 04:42 AM
I think it's highly unlikely that you would be allergic to all forms of oestrogen, as before menopause you were producing plenty of your own, and even now you are almost certainly producing some. So bio-identical hormones may work for you. Another possibility is that HRT should contain progesterone as well as oestrogen - adjusting the relative levels of these might be a solution.
There seem to be a lot of clinics around dealing with menopause problems. This link http:///www.menopauseclinics.org/index.php (http://www.menopauseclinics.org/index.php) might be useful.

Kazzimo
27th February 2010, 10:01 AM
Thanks once again for your advice Tich. I will take a look at the link Nutmeg, thanks for that. I'm afraid that my GP might think i'm a pain if I ask for yet another referral. I had to be referred recently to a dermatologist as I have morphea and in particular a patch on my back and wanted to get this checked out before surgery. Again, I am wondering whether the HRT could have flared this up as it had been dormant for several years? As Lucy7 said, and which I have read in the past, HRT can be like putting petrol on fire for certain conditions, especially those that are thought to be linked to hormones. I would be interested to hear if anyone else has this condition too? Its all too much to think about at the moment really but I don't just want to ignore the issue and end up old before my time!

macky
2nd March 2010, 04:40 AM
This is a great thread. I honestly did not connect the pain when it started to menapause and I was 46. I had an easy menapause not counting the pain with my back and its just like I have had a sudden awakening thanks to this that it all may have started pain wise because I started menapause around then and also had thyroid problems. Clever arent I, 13 years later I put it all together.!!

Thankyou all
Lorraine.