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Dingo
13th June 2009, 12:24 AM
Torso rotation therapy has been repeatedly found to be effective for the treatment of Scoliosis. There are links floating around about this therapy in various new and ancient threads. I decided to post all known links here. If you know of any study or anecdotal information that is either pro or con please post it here for other parents.

September-17-2008 - Video: MedX torso machine reduces 8 year old girl's curve from 14 degrees to 8 degrees. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xfkn_d3WX_o)
Roger Schwab: "We've seen it work on almost every case that we've had."
Main Line Health and Fitness Scoliosis page (http://www.mlhf.com/scoliosis.html)

News Story: MedX torso machine reduces 8 year old girl's curve from 14 degrees to 8 degrees. (http://www.wcsh6.com/news/health/story.aspx?storyid=92954&catid=8)
Same story from above but this link includes a printed version. Evidently this story ran on several TV stations across the country.

The above therapy is based on these 3 torso rotation strength training studies. All 3 studies found that torso rotation strength training stopped curve progression in all small and moderate curves. Many curves were reduced.

February 2003 - Study: The Role of Measured Resistance Exercises in Adolescent Scoliosis (http://www.medxonline.com/downloads/articles/measuredresistanceinscoliosis.pdf)
16 of the 20 patients demonstrated curve reduction, and although some fluctuation occured, none of the remaining 4 patients had a persistent increase in curve. No patient required surgery or bracing.

2006 - Study: Trunk rotational strength training for the management of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17108439?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_Discovery_RA&linkpos=1&log$=relatedarticles&logdbfrom=pubmed)
Seven adolescents with AIS (5 female 2 male; mean 14 yrs +/- 2.6 yrs; mean Cobb 28 degrees +/- 6 degrees range 20 degrees -37 degrees) underwent four months of supervised trunk rotational strength training, and repeat strength test. Four individuals showed reduction (>5 degrees) in their original curve, and 3 remained the same (+/-5 degrees).

July 2008 - Study: Treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with quantified trunk rotational strength training: a pilot study. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18600146?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_RVXml)
Patients received a 4-month supervised followed by a 4-month home trunk rotational strength training program.
Quantified trunk rotational strength training significantly increased strength. It was not effective for curves measuring 50 to 60 degrees. It appeared to help stabilize curves in the 20 to 40-degree ranges for 8 months, but not for 24 months. Periodic additional supervised strength training may help the technique to remain effective, although additional experimentation will be necessary to determine this.


March 2007 - The Journal Of Musculoskeletal Medicine
Photocopied report: Dr. Vert Mooney: Exercise For Managing Adolescent Scoliosis (http://www.fasciaresearch.com/WCLBP/Barcelona/Mooney_Exercise%20for%20Managing%20Adolescent%20Sc oliosis.pdf)
We combined this experience with that of a physiotherapist in New Zealand who was using the same equipment and the same protocols for a total of 31 patients with adolescent scoliosis. The mean curvature was 29.5 degrees (range 10 to 50) when treatment started and 25.1 degrees (minimum decrease, 4 and maximum decrease 43) when it concluded. ...None of the patients worsened.
In most cases the curvature can be reduced. Brief exercises performed twice a week are adequate. Braces are not necessary.

May-18-2006 - Thread: Gerbo asks Dr. Vert Mooney a few questions about Torso rotation and the longterm effects of this therapy (http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showthread.php?t=3627)
Gerbo: Similarly to what i asked a year ago, are you still following your initial study group and has stabilisation been maintained?
Dr. Mooney: I have followed some and stabilization has been maintained.

tonibunny
13th June 2009, 01:50 AM
Ah, I was going to mention that Gerbo's daughter was doing these exercises a couple of years back! He was a moderator here. We haven't seen him for quite a while though, and he seems to have disappeared from NSF too. I do hope Laura is OK; last I heard, her curves had increased despite doing these exercises and wearing the Spinecor brace. I hope she hasn't had to have surgery :(

Gerbo, if you're out there, please let us know how Laura is! :squeeze:

Sealy
13th June 2009, 10:36 AM
I don’t think he will be back after the fiasco at the NSF with a few hostile cyber bullies. I don’t believe Laura was wearing it much as she was in intensive Ballet training and was out of the brace for 6 hour stretches and finally stopped wearing it all together when there was indication of progression. She also stopped doing the torso rotation exercises at around the same time. Things deteriorated very rapidly when Gerbo took her to an osteopath who started manipulating the musculature around the spine.

Dingo
13th June 2009, 04:23 PM
I don’t think he will be back after the fiasco at the NSF with a few hostile cyber bullies. I don’t believe Laura was wearing it much as she was in intensive Ballet training and was out of the brace for 6 hour stretches and finally stopped wearing it all together when there was indication of progression. She also stopped doing the torso rotation exercises at around the same time. Things deteriorated very rapidly when Gerbo took her to an osteopath who started manipulating the musculature around the spine.

There are a few cyber-bullies at NSF whose main goal is to discourage children and parents. These people are pro-fusion. They denounce every type of physical or bracing therapy.

That's too bad about Gerbo's daughter. Dr. Mooney says that rotation therapy will keep the spine stable indefinitely. I imagine it would be a pain to visit a gym twice per week. However you can buy a new MedX torso rotator for (I believe) about $6,000. When my son is 7 or 8 I plan to do so. We are doing physical therapy modeled after the Mooney study and it appears to have had an impact. I'll find out for sure at Scott's next recheck in 5 months.

mark
13th June 2009, 08:36 PM
Sorry to here that Gerbo's daughter's curves have got bigger. Thanks for the posts Dingo, you always come up with some very interesting points. I hope your child manages to remain surgery free and the curves don't progress

Sealy
13th June 2009, 09:03 PM
I cried when I found out. Gerbo was such a lovely man and he tried so hard to help his daughter and in the end gave up completely.

mark
13th June 2009, 09:07 PM
Its so sad, he was so strong in his beliefs, it makes me feel so, so, sorry for him. I wondered why he stopped coming. I suppose he just felt that he could'nt, i wish he would pop back, i liked the bloke a lot, he was funny, compassionate and a right nice fella

Dingo
13th June 2009, 09:23 PM
I hope your child manages to remain surgery free and the curves don't progress

Thanks Mark,

I hope so too. I'm trying my hardest anyway.

Sealy

Gerbo was such a lovely man and he tried so hard to help his daughter and in the end gave up completely

He gave up completely? That is so sad. Do you know how bad his daughter's curve was?

Is it possible that his daughter is past her growth phase and he lost interest because she is basically home free? Could it have been a happy ending instead of sad?

mark
13th June 2009, 09:25 PM
Hi Dingo, no unfortunately Gerbo's daughter was and is still in the middle of her growth spurts

tonibunny
13th June 2009, 09:28 PM
It doesn't look like it Dingo :( Laura had a small compensatory thoracic curve and despite their best efforts, it eventually became structural and ended up larger than her original lumbar curve. I'd love to hear good news though.

Dingo
13th June 2009, 10:17 PM
I don’t believe Laura was wearing it much as she was in intensive Ballet training and was out of the brace for 6 hour stretches and finally stopped wearing it all together when there was indication of progression. She also stopped doing the torso rotation exercises at around the same time.

Scoliosis occurs at a high rate in teen atheletes. Swimmers, dancers, cheerleaders and kids in single arm sports like badminton have high rates of Scoliosis. Somehow the body finds a way to favor a side and for some kids that's trouble. For a kid who already has Scoliosis that might lead to BIG trouble.

Here is a study on Scoliosis in swimmers. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3512101)

The high-repetition nature of competitive swimming causes imbalances of musculature in the adolescent athlete. Scoliosis as a musculoskeletal condition of the adolescent can be detected in high incidence among swimmers owing to the training phenomenon.


Unless my son's curve drops to 0 he is officially banned from doing any of those sports competitively until his 17th birthday. For boys that's when the spine stops growing. I don't mind if he swims or plays sports with his friends but he doesn't need to swim competitively 2 hours per day at practice.

mark
13th June 2009, 10:25 PM
Hi Dingo, 0 degrees is a proper straight back, maybe you could cut the wee guy a little slack, 0 to 10 is the norm, i just don't want you alienating your son (sorry i'm being very British here), your a really cool guy who is just looking out for his son but i wouldnt want your son missing out on some stuff he may regret later. Does that make any sense, if it doesnt ignore my post and take it in the spirit it was posted in (i.e. 100 percent support).

mark

Dingo
13th June 2009, 10:35 PM
mark


0 degrees is a proper straight back, maybe you could cut the wee guy a little slack, 0 to 10 is the norm, i just don't want you alienating your son (sorry i'm being very British here)

I know what you are saying and I don't mind how he plays with his friends. Any kind of play, sports or activity is good for him. It's the intensity of daily, competitive sports that worries me. It's a fine line to walk because you are right, I don't want to alienate him.

If he has a 5+/- degree curve I'll probably be a softy. ;)

Baltimore Washington Medical Center page on Scoliosis (http://health.bwmc.umms.org/patiented/articles/who_gets_scoliosis_000068_3.htm)

Young Athletes
Scoliosis may be evident in young athletes, with a prevalence of 2 - 24%. The highest rates are observed among dancers, gymnasts, and swimmers. The scoliosis may have been due in part to loosening of the joints, delay in puberty onset (which can lead to weakened bones), and stresses on the growing spine. There have also been other isolated reports of a higher risk for scoliosis in young athletes who engage vigorously in sports that put an uneven load on the spine. These include figure skating, dance, tennis, skiing, and javelin throwing, among other sports. In most cases, the scoliosis is minor, and everyday sports do not lead to scoliosis. Exercise has many benefits for people both young and old and may even help patients with scoliosis.

mark
13th June 2009, 10:38 PM
Your a good dad, i can see that, Dingo, take some time out for yourself, your no good to your son if your burned out, i have an unstable relationship with my dad, i blamed him for giving me my back, its took me 20 years to get over it, it was always stand up straight, sit up straight blahh bla blahh, well pops i was sat up straight i was standing as straight as i could, i never got cut any slack, does tat make any sense

Dingo
13th June 2009, 10:48 PM
Mark
take some time out for yourself, your no good to your son if your burned out,

Is it that obvious? It's all I think about while I'm working and right up until I fall asleep. My first thought of the day is Scott's back. I probably need a break.


i have an unstable relationship with my dad, i blamed him for giving me my back, its took me 20 years to get over it, it was always stand up straight, sit up straight blahh bla blahh, well pops i was sat up straight i was standing as straight as i could, i never got cut any slack, does tat make any sense

I think we shared the same dad. :) As a kid I don't think I did a single thing correct and anything bad that happened to me was my fault.

mark
13th June 2009, 10:53 PM
And i can see your not like that with your son, like i said your a good dad take it easy, your no good to your son burned out. If you want to look at my story, look at my sig, its got a link to y story, go to page 8 and read on thats me in all my horrible glory

Sealy
13th June 2009, 10:57 PM
My daughter was diagnosed very young, and I read about these high risks sports years ago, so I knew in advance. Iím glad she has never shown an interest in ballet or gymnastics. She does swim but not competitively. I think its important to know how to swim for obvious reasons.

Dingo
14th June 2009, 10:48 PM
Mark

If you want to look at my story, look at my sig, its got a link to y story, go to page 8 and read on thats me in all my horrible glory

I hadn't read your story before today but I remember the first time I saw the pic in your signature. I checked out your photos immediately. I'm 39, you must be about my age.

I bet when you wear a shirt your kyphosis isn't noticable to non-experts. My wife's grandmother has a small kyphosis and I never noticed it until my son was diagnosed with Scoliosis. Now I know what to look for.

Your sig pic tells quite a story without any words needed. My son has a rib hump and it's barely visible when he is standing. However when he bends over it's obvious.

Before Scott's diagnosis I had been giving him baths for 5 years and I'd never seen that hump once. After the doctor pointed it out it's all I can see. :eek2:

He has been on physical therapy based on Mooney's torso rotation study and in just one month his rotation and hump have visibly diminished. I hope I'm not imagining improvement. If there is measurable improvement by his checkup I'll try and get his x-rays to post online along with his simple workout.

Sealy
16th June 2009, 01:08 PM
It should be noted that doctors 'watched and waited' for Laura's curve to progress to 29 degrees before starting treatment with a TLSO and then she went into the Spinecor brace. She was initially diagnosed with a curve in the low twenties (22 I think) and doctors didn't want to do anything. I believe she was 10 or 11 years old at the time and just entering the adolescent growth spurt. She was at high risk for progression when initially diagnosed.

Dingo
16th June 2009, 04:31 PM
Sealy

It should be noted that doctors 'watched and waited' for Laura's curve to progress to 29 degrees before starting treatment with a TLSO and then she went into the Spinecor brace. She was initially diagnosed with a curve in the low twenties (22 I think) and doctors didn't want to do anything.

Uggh... it's the same sad story over and over again. On the positive side maybe Laura is 14 or 15 by now.

Was it at 29 degrees that they swung into gear on the physical therapy?

Sealy
16th June 2009, 04:37 PM
I think Gerbo mentioned that she's 15 now. Surprisingly, she has very little rotation so there is very little deformity. Many people have enquired about Laura because they obviously care and I hope Gerbo doesn't mind.

mark
16th June 2009, 06:24 PM
Mark



I hadn't read your story before today but I remember the first time I saw the pic in your signature. I checked out your photos immediately. I'm 39, you must be about my age.

I bet when you wear a shirt your kyphosis isn't noticable to non-experts. My wife's grandmother has a small kyphosis and I never noticed it until my son was diagnosed with Scoliosis. Now I know what to look for.

Your sig pic tells quite a story without any words needed. My son has a rib hump and it's barely visible when he is standing. However when he bends over it's obvious.

Hi Dingo, big sigh, if only it wasn't noticeable under my clothing my life perhaps wouldn't have gone the way it did. But heh this 2009 not 1984, yes i'm just a year younger than you. I hope you and everyone else going down the conservative line make it unscathed and your kids can kiss this nasty condition good bye and get on with the rest of your lives.

If however surgery is the only option, please and speaking from massive amounts of experience go ahead with it. I lived 38 years with a nasty 100 degree curve and its proper messed up my head and life. I just hope it works out for you all but if doesn't its not the end of the world, surgery is not the butchery it used to be in the old days.

I hope some of that makes sense, if you read my sig, then you will know some of what i have gone through throughout my life and i would nt wish it on anyone

Dingo
18th June 2009, 08:09 PM
2000 - Study/Report: A Preliminary Report On The Effect Of Measured Strength Training In Adolescent Idiotpathic Scoliosis (http://medxonline.com/downloads/articles/prelimadolescentscoliosis.pdf)
Myolectric activity was asymmetric in both sides and in abdominal and paraspinal muscles of all patients. These asymmetries were corrected completely with torso rotation, which was associated with significant strength gains.

...there is a consistent asymmetry in torso rotation strength that can be shown with specific strength testing and with myolectric activity. This is definitely abnormal.

Dingo
22nd June 2009, 06:11 AM
I've done reading that suggests that the oblique abdominal muscles might be a muscle group that children with Scoliosis could focus on.

It is well known that children with AIS have muscle asymmetry. Put simply one side of the back and one side of the abs are stronger than the other (left vs. right). This is one reason that Dr. Mooney became interested in torso rotation strength training.

The oblique abdominals are one of the most important muscle groups that rotate the torso.

2007 - Study: Trunk rotational strength asymmetry in adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis: an observational study (http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=2072936)Multiple muscle groups are involved in rotating the trunk. Among the most important muscle groups for trunk rotation are the oblique abdominal muscles. It is possible that the measured strength asymmetry is a result of altered biomechanics of the oblique abdominal muscles due to the asymmetrical torso.

It's possible that even without access to a MedX it may still be beneficial to strength train the oblique abdominals.

Here is a video of a woman working her oblique abdominals with an exercise called the Side Plank (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TzI8j776Z8).

Dingo
23rd June 2009, 03:03 AM
Another study that suggests that Dr. Mooney's theory of strength training for symmetry is sound.

February 2006 - Study - Geometric and electromyographic assessments in the evaluation of curve progression in idiopathic scoliosis. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16449906)

In the natural history of idiopathic scoliosis, SGV (remaining growth) and EMG (muscle imbalance) ratio at the lower end vertebra are prominent risk factors of curve progression. The asymmetric (imbalanced) muscle activity is associated with increased axial rotation, which in its turn is associated with increasing Cobb angle and diminishing kyphosis.

Translation: The more growth that remains + the greater the muscle imbalance = more spine rotation which in turn leads to a larger cobb angle.

Obviously this is an average of 105 kids. Every spine "breaks" a little differently.

Dr. Douglas Kiester told me essentially the same thing (http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showthread.php?t=8948). First the spine rotates and then growth pushes out the lateral curve.

Sealy
23rd June 2009, 01:09 PM
Here is a video of a woman working her oblique abdominals with an exercise called the Side Plank (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TzI8j776Z8).

Thanks for the links, Dingo! One question... how does one know which side to exercise? Are both sides recommended? I believe there is a stronger side to begin with and it's the convex side, right?

Dingo
23rd June 2009, 11:26 PM
Sealy


I believe there is a stronger side to begin with and it's the convex side, right?


I've never been able to figure out which side of the back is strong and which is weak because I don't know which muscles pull which direction.

However this is from the study...
They reported that patients with idiopathic scoliosis were weak when rotating toward their curve's concave side and suggested a relation between the strength asymmetry and progression of the spinal curvature.

My son has a right thorocolumbar curve. In theory he will be weaker when he rotates LEFT or COUNTERCLOCKWISE. That should apply to most kids because right curves are the most common.

One question... how does one know which side to exercise? Are both sides recommended?

Although it makes sense to focus on the weak side it's hard to know how the muscles in the spine are attached or how they operate together. In all 3 torso rotation strength training studies the scientists worked on both sides equally. They focused on increasing overall strength (something like 50%) and making the left and right sides equally strong. To date it's the only physical therapy that's been scientifically proven to work. I don't know why it works but it's hard to argue with success. :)

tonibunny
24th June 2009, 12:02 AM
Hi Dingo,

Any idea what would be recommended if you have a double major curve where both curves have quite a high apex? (Say, T4 and L1)?

Toni

Dingo
24th June 2009, 03:14 AM
tonibunny


Any idea what would be recommended if you have a double major curve where both curves have quite a high apex? (Say, T4 and L1)?


I think your problem is one reason (probably among many) that torso rotation strength training focuses on both sides equally. It's impossible to know how hard to work each side to build muscle symmetry.

Mooney found that strengthening BOTH sides produced consistent positive results. I'm going to make up some numbers but this is basically what happens.

Torso Rotation therapy day 1
Rotate left maximum: 40 pounds
Rotate right maximum: 60 pounds

Torso Rotation 2 months later
Rotate left maximum: 80 pounds
Rotate right maximum: 80 pounds

Rather than attempt to equal out the body at a low level it's easier and more practical to grow both sides to a larger, equal level of strength. In addition the extra muscle mass may help keep the spine in place. Girls tend to have worse Scoliosis than boys and it's at least possible that muscle mass plays a role in that.

I've posted this before but scroll to page 4 of this study (http://www.medxonline.com/downloads/articles/measuredresistanceinscoliosis.pdf) to see the different types of curves that were positively impacted. Keep in mind that none of these kids were braced.

In all 3 torso rotation studies this therapy worked for almost every curve.

Dingo
24th June 2009, 04:32 AM
I just got a private message from a mom who tried the plank (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1TzI8j776Z8) with her daughter.

She said that her daughter had no problem performing the exercise on one side. Then she tried the other side and had significant trouble staying up. Her pelvis kept rocking back and forth. She called the difference "drastic".

Although most people (including myself until recently) haven't heard of this phenomenon scientists are well aware of it. Just 30 minutes of strength training per week can correct this completely and in theory it could have a positive impact on Scoliosis.

Imagine that muscles on one side of the spine are pulling with 10 pounds of force and the muscles on the other side are pulling with 7 pounds of force. This imbalance goes on 24/7 for a lifetime. It doesn't take a lot of imagination to see that curve progression might result from this. In fact it's hard to imagine how this wouldn't create a curve.

I would love to test this on my son but he is on vacation until July 2.

Dingo
7th July 2009, 05:41 AM
Physical therapists in Oregon tested Dr. Mooney's protocol and produced the same results.

BioMechanics Archives:: February 2005
Revisiting exercise and scoliosis management (http://www.biomech.com/full_article/?ArticleID=771&month=2&year=2005)

Our results using an identical testing and treatment protocol as described in the aforementioned studies reveal equally promising results. For example, one 12-year-old female graduate of our program radiographically demonstrated a 5 degrees curve reversal without the use of bracing. While we await the results of larger studies currently under way that address exercise-based management of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, it is intriguing to contemplate that the muscle imbalances associated with scoliosis may be more causative than consequential. Such a possibility provides additional promise for conservative management of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis due to the plasticity of muscle tissue, particularly in the young adult. Thank you for a most welcome publication on a topic of great interest for the conservatively minded practitioner.

cherrybird
8th July 2009, 04:19 PM
Out of interest does anyone know what the maximum correction has been to date? i.e curve angles before and after?

Dingo
8th July 2009, 08:49 PM
cherrybird

I don't have access to every study but in the first study 3 of the participants had very large curve reductions after just 4 months of strength training.

25 down to 5
31 down to 16
50 down to 32

Scroll to page 4 of this study (http://www.medxonline.com/downloads/articles/measuredresistanceinscoliosis.pdf) to see the rest.

Main Line Health and Fitness (http://www.mlhf.com/scoliosis.html) claims that many children achieve a 50% reduction in their curve utilizing this and complementary strength training exercises.

I believe that Northwest Spine Management (http://www.blueskywebdevelopment.com/nwspine/index.php) offers a similar program. No doubt many physical therapists are starting to offer this across the United States.

cherrybird
8th July 2009, 10:28 PM
Thanks Dingo,
It's really interesting stuff, and i'll be watching my daughter like a hawk, if there is any posibility she inherits it from me I want to try and avoid surgery for her for as long as possible.

GloomCookie
10th July 2009, 04:44 PM
This is so interesting! Thanks for posting it :D

Dingo
11th July 2009, 12:44 AM
I have a copy of the recent McIntire study (http://journals.lww.com/jspinaldisorders/Abstract/2008/07000/Treatment_of_Adolescent_Idiopathic_Scoliosis_With. 10.aspx) on Torso Rotation strength training and one thing really stood out.

At the end of 32 training sessions (4 months) on the MedX machine in a gym patients switched to unmonitored home strength training. The 4 month home program consisted of just 1 exercise. The child was instructed to tie a gold colored Thera-Band to a door knob, sit in a chair, hold the Thera-Band and rotate against the resistance. Patients were instructed to perform 3 sets of 15 repetitions to the left and to the right 3 to 5 times a week. This would take roughly 3 minutes.

How was compliance?

Although the patients were instructed in the home-based strength exercise program previously described, we did not effectively monitor their compliance. Our impression through retrospective inquiries was that only about one-third of them were reasonably compliant.

These kids knew that they were being studied and yet very few did their exercises at home. To me this calls into question whether it's possible to accurately study home strength training. Perhaps any strength training program would be helpful but it's hard to know because most teens aren't motivated enough to do it.

The results:
After 4 months on the MedX machine all children had stable curves. After an additional 4 months of home strength training (which 2/3rds of kids didn't do) all children still had stable curves. This lead the authors to remark,
Thus, it seemed that the supervised strength training effect lasted at least 4 months.

Put simply the impact of the MedX lasted an additional 4 months after training stopped.

From their discussion:
This finding is preliminary for 3 reasons. First, compliance with the 4-month home-based strength exercise was low. Second, no emphasis was placed on continuing the home training after the 8-month followup. And third, our protocol did not provide for additional supervised training intervals, which could be anticipated to result in further strengthening and thus added spine stabilization. If further investment is to be made in attempting to develop rotational trunk strengthening as a nonoperative treatment option for AIS, better monitoring of compliance with the home-based program and further experimentation to determine the optimum dose of strength training will be needed.

Dingo
11th July 2009, 12:46 AM
GloomCookie

Thanks Gloom! I hope this helps someone. :)

Dr. Stitzel
11th July 2009, 01:20 PM
Torso rotation therapy has been repeatedly found to be effective for the treatment of Scoliosis. There are links floating around about this therapy in various new and ancient threads. I decided to post all known links here. If you know of any study or anecdotal information that is either pro or con please post it here for other parents.

September-17-2008 - Video: MedX torso machine reduces 8 year old girl's curve from 14 degrees to 8 degrees. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xfkn_d3WX_o)
Roger Schwab: "We've seen it work on almost every case that we've had."
Main Line Health and Fitness Scoliosis page (http://www.mlhf.com/scoliosis.html)

News Story: MedX torso machine reduces 8 year old girl's curve from 14 degrees to 8 degrees. (http://www.wcsh6.com/news/health/story.aspx?storyid=92954&catid=8)
Same story from above but this link includes a printed version. Evidently this story ran on several TV stations across the country.

The above therapy is based on these 3 torso rotation strength training studies. All 3 studies found that torso rotation strength training stopped curve progression in all small and moderate curves. Many curves were reduced.

February 2003 - Study: The Role of Measured Resistance Exercises in Adolescent Scoliosis (http://www.medxonline.com/downloads/articles/measuredresistanceinscoliosis.pdf)


2006 - Study: Trunk rotational strength training for the management of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17108439?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_DiscoveryPanel.Pubmed_Discovery_RA&linkpos=1&log$=relatedarticles&logdbfrom=pubmed)


July 2008 - Study: Treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with quantified trunk rotational strength training: a pilot study. (http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18600146?ordinalpos=1&itool=EntrezSystem2.PEntrez.Pubmed.Pubmed_ResultsP anel.Pubmed_RVXml)




March 2007 - The Journal Of Musculoskeletal Medicine
Photocopied report: Dr. Vert Mooney: Exercise For Managing Adolescent Scoliosis (http://www.fasciaresearch.com/WCLBP/Barcelona/Mooney_Exercise%20for%20Managing%20Adolescent%20Sc oliosis.pdf)



May-18-2006 - Thread: Gerbo asks Dr. Vert Mooney a few questions about Torso rotation and the longterm effects of this therapy (http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showthread.php?t=3627)
Gerbo:
Dr. Mooney:

HI Dingo my friend,
We have a digital motion x-ray unit and will be doing some research using the med-x concept very soon. I'll share that info with you ASAP. It seems that (in a typical "S" curve pattern) doing the twist to the right isometrically and to the left isotonically may produce the most benefit. Again, I'll pass the results onto you as soon as I get them.
We have a long list of projects going on right now and sometimes there is a line of the DMX unit.

Dr. Stitzel
11th July 2009, 01:25 PM
News Story: MedX torso machine reduces 8 year old girl's curve from 14 degrees to 8 degrees. (http://www.wcsh6.com/news/health/story.aspx?storyid=92954&catid=8)
Same story from above but this link includes a printed version. Evidently this story ran on several TV stations across the country.


BTW, I just reduced a 12 year old girl's curvature from 12 to 3 in 5 days.....not bragging. No medX necessary.......just control the head and pelvis coordination through involuntary neuro-muscular rehab. The mother cried and the kid laughed.....the 12 year old knew we could beat it all along.....this defeated attiude towards scoliosis treatment seems to be a learned adult behavior.

Dingo
11th July 2009, 04:45 PM
Dr. Stitzel

We have a digital motion x-ray unit and will be doing some research using the med-x concept very soon. I'll share that info with you ASAP. It seems that (in a typical "S" curve pattern) doing the twist to the right isometrically and to the left isotonically may produce the most benefit. Again, I'll pass the results onto you as soon as I get them.

Right on! I can't wait to see the results. As I run across Torso rotation links I post them in this thread and another one on scoliosis.org (http://www.scoliosis.org/forum/showthread.php?t=8976). As I find them I post them so they are sprinkled through the thread.

GloomCookie
13th July 2009, 04:45 PM
I don't wish this to sound offensive, but this seems really, really obvious (now it's been pointed out to me anyway :D) I'm amazed it's not a bigger part of non surgical scoliosis treatment already!

Dingo
13th July 2009, 07:42 PM
GloomCookie

I agree and I think the biggest problem is time. The first full study was released in 2003. That's only 6 years ago. Maybe in another 5 or 10 years it will start to become a mainstream therapy for adolescents and older juveniles.

It took the medical community well over 100 years before they would accept that ulcers were caused by bacteria despite loads of evidence (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_peptic_ulcer_disease_and_Helicobacter_ pylori). Just a few decades ago the medical community worked to discredit and even fine doctors who CURED people of ulcers because they felt it wasn't possible.

1968: Lykoudis is fined 4,000 drachmas for treating PUD patients with his treatment, which includes antibiotics

If it takes the medical community 15 or 20 years to embrace Torso Rotation Strength Training I guess that's pretty good. :)

titch
13th July 2009, 09:46 PM
The fantastic thing about the torso rotation is the fact that it is being properly assessed, documented and followed up - it's possible to be certain of the results, rather than the more usual situation with non-surgical treatments, where they clearly have some promise, but are promised to work for everyone and a few case studies with remarkable results may be published, yet there are people they don't work for and few who achieve the remarkable results. I would hope that the way that the torso rotation is being studied will mean that it is possible to retrospectively determine whether there are particular curve patterns for which it is more beneficial, other features of curves that make it more or less successful (does it work on stiff curves - if it does, it could be worth it even in cases that will still need surgery if it helps "release" the spine), and whether there are any genuine cut off points at which the therapy may cease to be adequately beneficial, etc etc. The more knowledge, the better!

pinkiepie235
17th July 2009, 04:29 PM
Hi, I'm new on this site. I'm taking my daughter Elise, 13 y.o., to Montreal on Wed. for our first appt. to get her spinecor. She has a 23 degree thoracolumbar curve- in May. (Who know's what it is now. It was only 13 degrees last October!) I'm so thankful for this site!!!

Dr. Stitzel,
BTW, I just reduced a 12 year old girl's curvature from 12 to 3 in 5 days.....not bragging. No medX necessary.......just control the head and pelvis coordination through involuntary neuro-muscular rehab. The mother cried and the kid laughed.....the 12 year old knew we could beat it all along.....this defeated attiude towards scoliosis treatment seems to be a learned adult behavior. http://www.scoliosis-support.org/images/buttons/quote.gif (http://www.scoliosis-support.org/newreply.php?do=newreply&p=127885)

Is this describing the torso rotation exercise or something different? Sorry if I'm not getting the obvious! Do you have an example of this on the web?

So, do you all think that it would be good for Elise to do this in her brace or out of it? She's a fast long distance runner and really needs to build up all her core muscles! Also her flexibility is really poor (no one in our family is the least bit flexible, however she is the only one with scoliosis. Its a mystery.). How important would you say is stretching the hamstrings?

Amazed Jean
17th July 2009, 06:54 PM
Pinkie Pie, Welcome to SSO. I am sorry about your daughter having to go through this but I'm sure she will do fine. Ask lots of questions, demand to see her xrays or get copies, do research etc. and trust your gut feelings. She might like to visit SSO also and chat with some younger members. Once again - welcome!:ghug: