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gowayouttadat
17th May 2009, 10:55 PM
Hi all, I had surgery for scholiosis 13 years ago when I was 12. I'm currently pregnant with my first child and was wondering what the chances are that the little one will also have scoliosis. My sister has a touch of scoliosis too but it's very mild. We've found out that the baby is a boy which I think reduces the risk of scoliosis. Can anyone shed some light on this for me? My GP has said that it's not an issue as it's not hereditary but I have read some articles on the internet that suggest that it might be genetic.

Also does anybody who has had surgery and has been through pregnancy advise on the likelihood of being able to have an epidural and natural birth?

Jill
17th May 2009, 11:48 PM
Hi!
I believe that scolosis is genetic. My grandmother suffered severe health problems due to hers. That is why I opted to have surgery. I have a 12 yr old and an 8 yr old. I just had surgery this year so both my kids were born post op. They refused to give me an epidural both times due to my scliosis. It might be different where you live though, so I would talk to my OB if I were you.I hope this helped.

Jill

madmclw
18th May 2009, 12:30 AM
I'm pretty sure the epidural is a case of fusion length rather than where you live, but that might be a complete myth I've picked up somewhere, so right now I'm looking at someone more knowledgable for clarification?

Mike
18th May 2009, 04:45 AM
Also does anybody who has had surgery and has been through pregnancy advise on the likelihood of being able to have an epidural and natural birth?

Hi, not experienced either as I'm a man, however I work at maternity quite a lot with the anaesthetists. Depending what level the fusion extends down to will go a long way to dictating whether an epidural is possible or not.

Obstetric epidurals are lumbar so that the correct nerve roots are blocked for normal delivery or ceasarian if necessary. The more movement there is in the lumbar spine the better as the intervertebral spaces can be opened up to let the needle through to the epidural space. However, with a big bump, contractions, screaming, fear etc even women with normal spines can't always move as much as we would like to make it easy. A lumbar fusion would certainly make it MUCH harder but not necessarily impossible, depending on how extensive the metalwork was, where it is, and how consolidated the ligaments have become without the normal everyday movement that the lumbar spine has. It would probably be a consultant that attempted it and not a junior, but they might possibly bale out early rather than keep poking around and risk other damage to your back.

titch
18th May 2009, 10:17 AM
It would probably be a consultant that attempted it and not a junior, but they might possibly bale out early rather than keep poking around and risk other damage to your back.

When I had my son 2 years ago, the head of anaesthetics was on duty when they induced me. I happened to have a copy of my xrays online, so admittedly not great quality, but after asking me stuff about it and hubby taking him off to show him the xrays, he was confident that he could do it - not a guarantee of course, but nonetheless pretty confident and certainly thought it was absolutely worth a go. He went off duty in the evening, and handed me over to one of his team - I slightly remember being introduced to the guy, but was also in the midst of major contractions, so don't remember too much. Anyway, the point is he didn't have the degree of experience of the senior consultant, and didn't want anything to do with giving me an epidural :lol:

I'm fused to L4, but am unusually complex. My right rod is long, and goes some way beyond L4, I've got moderate stenosis at L4-5, compression of the right nerve root at L4-5, facet arthritis at that level, etc as well as being out of spinal alignment both in a front and a side view, so it would need to be someone unusually well trained and brave to go anywhere near me to be fair!!

The one piece of advice I will give is that unless you are absolutely determined to have a non-caesarian birth, think very carefully before letting them put you on a drip to induce you. Especially think very carefully about this if you are prone to muscular pain and getting in a knot so that you can't straighten up for the pain, or if you have SPD to a problematic degree. The reason for this is that in women with normal spines, induction with the hormone drip increases the likelihood of pain, and the need for epidural and increases the chances of needing a caesarian as well. If you've not got a consultant anaesthetist on hand who is willing to try an epidural, I'd try to avoid induction unless you are normally pain free and unrestricted.

That is not to say that a normal birth isn't possible of course! There are many women who have natural births even with very long fusions, so I'm in no way suggesting there's any reason this is not possible for you. But they do like to induce if you are overdue, or if they think the baby is getting unusually large. They simply didn't apply logic with me - between the fact I have significant chronic pain and I had severe SPD, it made no sense to induce me rather than go straight to a c-section once I developed pre-eclampsia. Hopefully your team will apply greater logic, but I just wanted to help you be prepared a little in case you do go overdue or have some other reason that they do an urgent induction (I don't believe either a stretch and sweep, or a prostin pessary count as an urgent induction, as both are designed to nudge you into starting labour fairly naturally.

I really hope that doesn't read as a worry, it's not how I mean it at all! Please do ask anything at all that you want - literally anything - and I'll do my best to answer. The last thing I will say is that however the birth goes, absolutely none of it matters anyway once you have your baby in your arms :)

gowayouttadat
18th May 2009, 03:31 PM
When I had my son 2 years ago, the head of anaesthetics was on duty when they induced me. I happened to have a copy of my xrays online, so admittedly not great quality, but after asking me stuff about it and hubby taking him off to show him the xrays, he was confident that he could do it - not a guarantee of course, but nonetheless pretty confident and certainly thought it was absolutely worth a go. He went off duty in the evening, and handed me over to one of his team - I slightly remember being introduced to the guy, but was also in the midst of major contractions, so don't remember too much. Anyway, the point is he didn't have the degree of experience of the senior consultant, and didn't want anything to do with giving me an epidural :lol:

I'm fused to L4, but am unusually complex. My right rod is long, and goes some way beyond L4, I've got moderate stenosis at L4-5, compression of the right nerve root at L4-5, facet arthritis at that level, etc as well as being out of spinal alignment both in a front and a side view, so it would need to be someone unusually well trained and brave to go anywhere near me to be fair!!

The one piece of advice I will give is that unless you are absolutely determined to have a non-caesarian birth, think very carefully before letting them put you on a drip to induce you. Especially think very carefully about this if you are prone to muscular pain and getting in a knot so that you can't straighten up for the pain, or if you have SPD to a problematic degree. The reason for this is that in women with normal spines, induction with the hormone drip increases the likelihood of pain, and the need for epidural and increases the chances of needing a caesarian as well. If you've not got a consultant anaesthetist on hand who is willing to try an epidural, I'd try to avoid induction unless you are normally pain free and unrestricted.

That is not to say that a normal birth isn't possible of course! There are many women who have natural births even with very long fusions, so I'm in no way suggesting there's any reason this is not possible for you. But they do like to induce if you are overdue, or if they think the baby is getting unusually large. They simply didn't apply logic with me - between the fact I have significant chronic pain and I had severe SPD, it made no sense to induce me rather than go straight to a c-section once I developed pre-eclampsia. Hopefully your team will apply greater logic, but I just wanted to help you be prepared a little in case you do go overdue or have some other reason that they do an urgent induction (I don't believe either a stretch and sweep, or a prostin pessary count as an urgent induction, as both are designed to nudge you into starting labour fairly naturally.

I really hope that doesn't read as a worry, it's not how I mean it at all! Please do ask anything at all that you want - literally anything - and I'll do my best to answer. The last thing I will say is that however the birth goes, absolutely none of it matters anyway once you have your baby in your arms :)

That was a great post. Thanks for the heads up.
I have no pain with my scholiosis. Never had. I play all kinds of sports and movement is no problem for me so I'm lucky that way.

You have in no way freaked me out about the whole thing! The doctor managed that all by herself. When I had my last hospital appointment I didn't see the consultant but instead saw one of his team who told me that she'd never seen a case of spinal fusion before so didn't know whether a natural birth was possible or not... so much for confidence in doctors!!

I am scheduled to meet with the consultant and an anaesathist at my next hospital visit on the 4th June. The doctor I saw previously told me that she would write to my surgeon to ask his opinion however I found out last week that no letter has been received so now I have to write one myself to get his opinion.

I was 12 when I had the surgery and because I've had no problems I've never paid any attention to rod length or where I'm fused from etc. I know the xrays at are home in my parents place so I'll bring them with me to the hospital.

To be honest I'm debating telling the consultant that I want a section. From my experiences so far I'm not confident with the doctors I have seen and at this stage I think opting for a section will cut out a lot of the can I/can't I hassle. I have no problem having a section as long as it's planned in advance. What I want to avoid is a situation where I'm told I can have a natural birth and an epidural and then on the day the anaesathist on duty won't do it or there are complications. What do you think?

Thanks for the advice on induction. I had no idea about any of that!

Cassie
18th May 2009, 07:14 PM
Hi all, I had surgery for scholiosis 13 years ago when I was 12. I'm currently pregnant with my first child and was wondering what the chances are that the little one will also have scoliosis. My sister has a touch of scoliosis too but it's very mild. We've found out that the baby is a boy which I think reduces the risk of scoliosis. Can anyone shed some light on this for me? My GP has said that it's not an issue as it's not hereditary but I have read some articles on the internet that suggest that it might be genetic.

Also does anybody who has had surgery and has been through pregnancy advise on the likelihood of being able to have an epidural and natural birth?

Hiya, I have 2 boys and twin girls and one of the twins has very mild lumbar scoliosis. None of them were C-sections, although all of them were difficult in their own ways! First one, I developed pre-eclampsia and had to have a general anaesthetic, 2nd one took for ever and the twins came early.

But, a bit like you, after I'd had the fusion in my teens, I just forgot about it and got on with life, so I never thought to mention my dodgy spine at any of the births, even the twins! (One of them was breech - ouch!) I didn't have any pain relief with them and managed. But I guess as I didn't wan't an epidural it didn't really come up in conversation. It was after the birth and looking after 2 babies that I started to get back problems :( but still worth it :)

Best of luck with it all, I'm sure you'll be fine.

cherrybird
18th May 2009, 07:29 PM
I had my little girl almost 3 years ago now and did have a pretty traumatic time of things but thats not the case for everyone with scoliosis. My pregnancy consultant wrote to my orthopaedic consultant to ask advice for an epidural. When he wrote back, he advised that epidural was not impossible as long as it was below the fusion, and done by an extremely experienced anaesthetist. I met with an anaesthetist who felt my spine and agreed she could do it. At 27 weeks I had pre-eclampsia and had no other option but to have the baby. Unfortunately there was another anaesthetist on duty who had difficulty getting an epidural in and it only numbed half my body. We were in a time critical period and I had to have a general anaesthetic. My orthopaedic consultant has since advised that if we have any more children I am not to have another epidural.
Although it sounds pretty desperate, and it took some time to get over the situation we were in, I have totally come to terms with it and realise that it was my lumbar curve and rotation that made things difficult. You will see a consultant so it might be worthwhile checking if they would contact your orthopaedic team. I have also been told that if we have another child, it is totally possible to have a natural delivery and we should really be aiming for that but with an open mind as if I have to have a c-section for any reason, it would have to be under general again.

Sorry if it sounds like I am rambling or scary but it's really true what they say, each birth is different and plan not to make definate plans.
If you want to ask any questions, pm me or post another message, i am more than happy to answer anything.
Claire

bara
18th May 2009, 08:26 PM
Despite having had an old-fashioned Harrington rod style fusion down to L1 for my thoracic curve and despite having a lumbar compensating curve, I can report that I managed to have an epidural for my second son's delivery (didn't need anything for #1 but #2 was a breech delivery in the days when that didn't automatically mean a section). I had all the information ready for the duty anaesthetist, who was happy to take my word for where the fusion was and that was it for the epidural. 24 years on, the only residual side-effect is upstairs watching TV ...

Ellie
19th May 2009, 10:20 AM
I have not had surgery, but had three 'normal' births, (no epidurals as my spine is too unstable) all extremely different! As said do not make any plans in advance as they will go out the window at the crucial moment.:)

I had amniocentesis done for two. They were all monitored by scan and given a thorough check up soon after birth.
They are all in their twenties now and seem to be fine! apart from football and rugby injuries!

I do think this is at least partially genetic (although I have been the worst case so far) my mother is a bit lopsided and my grandmother also had back issues!

mark
19th May 2009, 02:17 PM
My Grandma, my mum and now me were inflicted with kyphosis. To me thats either an enormous streak of bad luck or its got something to a do with a dodgy gene.

jollop
19th May 2009, 02:36 PM
mark at least you know from generations that there was kyphosis in your family.no one in my family have any spine problems.i had to be the unluckiest person ever:(.just hope and pray none of my kids get it.

mark
19th May 2009, 03:57 PM
Yes i hope so too i wouldn't put anyone through what i went through for all the tea in china. I feel exactly the same about my daughter and to be honest it was the reason why i was very reluctant to become a parent myself

titch
19th May 2009, 04:08 PM
I don't mean this to in any way belittle anyone's experiences or worries, but just to share why I have what is perhaps a slightly different perspective.

Basically, school was absolute torture for me. I was teased, bullied, beaten up, made fun of, had cups of wee thrown over me, all sorts of things. While there were other reasons as well, I ended up with a very deep depression and made more than one suicide attempt, some more serious than others, and failed largely due to sheer good luck rather than anything else. While I had developed my scoliosis during this time - with hindsight, I'm pretty sure the curve was apparent by the time I was 8, it was undiagnosed and as it was a low thoracolumbar curve it was not obvious visually and was not diagnosed until I was nearly 16.

At the same time, I saw kids who did have things visibly wrong with them not getting half the grief that I did. I'm not sure how much that was down to things at that particular school, but I remember thinking that things would surely be better if there was something genuine and obvious wrong with me, because it would be difficult to live with but at least I wouldn't get all the mental and physical abuse I was suffering.

So basically I've come to parenthood from a different perspective of knowing that actually, it may well not matter even if you have nothing wrong with you. All it takes is one fatherless toerag to kick things off, and a ton of others will jump on the bandwagon. I don't believe my son will have things worse even if he does develop a curvature, and in any case I'll be there prepared to step in and do whatever it takes, and will not be telling him that it's at least partly his fault because of course the bullies will continue when it's so obvious from his face that it's upsetting him. He won't have to go through what I did, because one way or another we'll make sure that he doesn't.

As I say, I don't mean that in any way to take away from the validity of anyone's experiences or worries, so I hope it doesn't come across like that at all.

mark
19th May 2009, 04:26 PM
I don't mean this to in any way belittle anyone's experiences or worries, but just to share why I have what is perhaps a slightly different perspective.

Basically, school was absolute torture for me. I was teased, bullied, beaten up, made fun of, had cups of wee thrown over me, all sorts of things. While there were other reasons as well, I ended up with a very deep depression and made more than one suicide attempt, some more serious than others, and failed largely due to sheer good luck rather than anything else. While I had developed my scoliosis during this time - with hindsight, I'm pretty sure the curve was apparent by the time I was 8, it was undiagnosed and as it was a low thoracolumbar curve it was not obvious visually and was not diagnosed until I was nearly 16

How our lives become so intertwinned i had much the same experiences as you titch. Its awful how while we are supposed to be having the happiest days days of our lives we spent much of it so misserable the only way we thought we could escape was to take our own lives.

Sorry to read you had such an awful time titch i can relate to every word you said

gowayouttadat
19th May 2009, 05:01 PM
Thanks everyone. I guess it's a case of wait and see.

Because I've been lucky enough not to suffer any real back pain since the surgery I really want to keep it that way. If having a natural birth gives me any reason to think that it could effect my back in any way then I want to have a section. It can't be any tougher than spinal surgery!!!

I'm terrified my little boy is going to have scoliosis. I believe it's genetic too. My granny's sister has it, although it's not severe and my sister has a touch of it too. Typically though, I am the worst. I don't want my little boy to have to go through what I went through with surgery etc and I know I'll blame myself if he does have it. There is nothing I can now though only wait and hope that he is ok.

mark
19th May 2009, 07:47 PM
I know I'll blame myself if he does have it. There is nothing I can now though only wait and hope that he is ok.

Don't blame yourself, i blamed my parents for years, how could they give birth to such a freak as me, why didnt do anything, why didnt my brother get and i didn't i wished i was everyone under the sun but me and after lots of years of these thoughts it got me down and cotributed to my first melt down, now i'm like so what i would never have got where i am today without being me and i would never of met you wonderful people

What i'm trying to say is blaming yourself is not going you or son any good, try and chanel those thoughts into getting something done, if (touch woood and pray to all the gods he doesnt) get it.

I hope that makes some kind of sense

mark

cherrybird
19th May 2009, 09:34 PM
No one in my family had heard of Scoliosis before me, but since then, I have a cousin with kyphosis, an aunt with scoliosis and my brother who I suspect has kyphosis but his gp won't even entertain an x-ray. There is certainly a worry about it being genetic, and I am constantly checking my daughter, but since she was born so prematurely I have got round to thinking that really it's not the worst condition she could ever have, after all she's extremely lucky to be here. With my eyes watching her, there is every chance we can catch it early if it does surface and my strength in dealing with it will make sure that I can understand exactly how she feels and we can fight it together, and that really is IF it surfaces in her. There is nothing at the minute that can prevent it ever happening but when it does, we have the knowledge behind us to make a difference to how our children get treated.
Claire

lindaaanderson
25th May 2009, 12:17 PM
Hi there - I've read all these posts with huge interest and also concern that for some of my new friends here life has been so tough - I really am sorry and already counting my blessings.

I never had surgery and I have had four children. When I was pregnant with my first I was told that an epidural would only be possible if a consultant anaesthetist was available as it would be difficult and risky. I pretty much decided that I would discount it as an option and instead made good use of the gas and air!

I went on to have two home deliveries and would really endorse the advice to resist being induced. My last child was two weeks overdue and 9lb 6oz but I gave birth naturally with only a hot water bottle as pain relief by resisting the huge pressure to be put on a drip. Obviously you do have to take your doctor or midwife's advice but I was fortunate in this case that they understood my concerns and supported me.

None of my family had scoliosis and my children seem to be okay too - looks like in my case it was just bad luck :-(

All the very best with the birth! Linda x

Mustang Sal
25th May 2009, 06:08 PM
This is a really interesting thread :)

I don't know whether or not scoliosis is genetic, or has a genetic element to it, but it does seem strange how, more often that not, people with scoliosis seem to have other family members with it too. I also don't know whether Spina Bifida is genetic, but i've kind of always thought it was - when my sister was pregnant, she was prescribed a higher than average dose of folic acid, because of the fact I have a neural tube disorder (SB occulta and diastematomyelia). Despite not really knowing to much about these things, i've always been so afraid that i'd pass it on to my children. I know it's not the end of the world if that did happen, but I would feel so guilty, so much so that i've sort of convinced myself that the whole having babies thing is not for me, which is a bit silly really! I have to say, meeting people on here who have had good pregnancies and healthy children has gone some way to make me question myself - perhaps it is possible after all?

The epidural thing is interesting - I'm only fused between L2 and L4, so I don't know whether that would be an issue, but I do remember the doctors having a lot of trouble getting a lumbar puncture needle in when I had a myelogram, and that was before my fusion! So it doesn't really look like it'd be very easy for me to have one - then again, i've never expressly asked anyone about it so it might not even be an issue. That's assuming i'd need a c-section - I kind of always assumed (perhaps wrongly) a natural birth would not be good because of my nerve damage, but then i'm sure lots of people have had far worse nerve problems than me and was able to, so who knows!

Does anyone know who I could speak to about stuff like this? Would my orthopaedic consultant be able to tell me anything, or would it be a case of wait until i'm actually pregnant before seeing an obstetrician?

Sorry for the ramble, just some thoughts i've had about my own situation :)

jollop
25th May 2009, 06:35 PM
hi sally if you have had spine surgery.an epidural isnt recommened due to the fact it can do more harm than good,from my experience of pregancies ,the doctor advised me to have c sections.and i had to be under a general anestetic

cherrybird
26th May 2009, 02:37 PM
Sal, my consultant had always said that if I had children he was happy for an attempt at epidural so long as it was below fusion, and I discussed it with him before becoming pregnant so there is no harm asking the questions there. Having a section wasn't really anything we had thought about, I just expected to use epidural for pain relief really, it's just unfortunate that things werent in my favour. He has now said that as 1 epidural was not successful, he would advise strongly against it for any further pregnancies, but then he has also said that I shouoldn't automatically plan for a section for further pregnancies either. I would ask the consultant before getting pregnant and then mention it to midwife/consultant and everyone else when you are. My Obs consultant wrote to Orthopeads anyway to confirm.
In terms of people feeling guilty about passing conditions on, it's easy to say don't feel guilty but you always will. I did blame my parents for ages and felt eternally greatful to a teacher who spotted my scoliosis. Since having my daughter, and everything she has gone through already, it's really made me realise that I am probably the best person she could have to help her through it if she does have scoliosis - at least she will never feel as i did that no-one around me understands.
Claire

Mustang Sal
28th May 2009, 06:01 PM
Sal, my consultant had always said that if I had children he was happy for an attempt at epidural so long as it was below fusion, and I discussed it with him before becoming pregnant so there is no harm asking the questions there. Having a section wasn't really anything we had thought about, I just expected to use epidural for pain relief really, it's just unfortunate that things werent in my favour. He has now said that as 1 epidural was not successful, he would advise strongly against it for any further pregnancies, but then he has also said that I shouoldn't automatically plan for a section for further pregnancies either. I would ask the consultant before getting pregnant and then mention it to midwife/consultant and everyone else when you are. My Obs consultant wrote to Orthopeads anyway to confirm.

Ah so it wouldn't be totally out of the question then. Mind you, I wouldn't really want them to have as many goes at an epidural as they did with the lumbar puncture! Perhaps that's something i'd tell them about if I ever cross that bridge.
Out of curiosity, does anyone know where the epidural needle goes in? Does it vary? My vertebrae at L1 and above are pretty normal (well, aside from being curved and rotated) whereas below that everything gets a bit wafty. Also, can an epidural damage the spinal cord? I'm guessing it's pretty safe as millions of people have it for pain relief during labour and also for some operations etc (I had one for my last op, although they put it in when I was under) - is it a smaller needle that the one used for lumbar punctures/myelograms?

In terms of people feeling guilty about passing conditions on, it's easy to say don't feel guilty but you always will. I did blame my parents for ages and felt eternally greatful to a teacher who spotted my scoliosis. Since having my daughter, and everything she has gone through already, it's really made me realise that I am probably the best person she could have to help her through it if she does have scoliosis - at least she will never feel as i did that no-one around me understands.
Claire

Do you know, i've never thought about it like that! Makes sense I guess. After all, aside from the surgery/hospitals malarky, I had a fairly normal childhood, so there's no reason to think that if a child of mine had spine problems, they wouldn't have a similar upbringing.

I can't say I was ever angry at or blamed my parents for this - i've never known anything different so how I am is my kind of 'normal'. They also never treated me any different to my siblings, which i'm so grateful for - there were always some horrible spoilt kids in the hospital, both in the outpatients area (which had the most amazing play area ever! It even had a wendy house!) and on the wards, so i'm glad my parents kept me grounded and drummed into me how lucky I was compared to some, which is something that has stayed with me :)

sunnyday04_kids
28th May 2009, 07:32 PM
I am very brand new to this forum, but I would like to just say that after last week I am sad to say that I truly believe there IS a genetic link to scoliosis as I grew up with it, and last week my two daughters (ages 9 and 16) were both diagnosed with it.

I am very concerned because right now my nine year old, who we never noticed a curve or anything on previously already has curves that are 52* and 42*...which if I am reading correctly, most always leads to having surgery! (is this correct, in your opinions?)

Unfortunately, I put my scoliosis out of my mind for many years until recently...wish I would have been more proactive. I feel very guilty at this point!

GloomCookie
29th May 2009, 01:19 PM
I am very brand new to this forum, but I would like to just say that after last week I am sad to say that I truly believe there IS a genetic link to scoliosis as I grew up with it, and last week my two daughters (ages 9 and 16) were both diagnosed with it.

I am very concerned because right now my nine year old, who we never noticed a curve or anything on previously already has curves that are 52* and 42*...which if I am reading correctly, most always leads to having surgery! (is this correct, in your opinions?)

Unfortunately, I put my scoliosis out of my mind for many years until recently...wish I would have been more proactive. I feel very guilty at this point!

:welcome:

I'm afraid I don't know much about juvenile scoliosis as I had/have AIS but I just wanted to say hi. I don't have children so I can only begin to imagine what it feels like to "pass on" something like this. I saw so many families at the RNOH with at least one child in a brace, and I noticed on three occasions one of the parents had either a scar that looked like a posterior scar or was in a post surgery brace themselves. Obviously I can't stop you feeling guilty but with two curves it's much harder to notice the more obvious signs of it, and nine is still very young, please don't beat yourself up! There'll be lots of people here who can give you some advice, but in the meantime welcome again, I hope we can help you out :squeeze:

sunnyday04_kids
29th May 2009, 05:00 PM
I appreciate the welcome, and your kind words. It's just hard to watch your kids go through anything like this knowing how much I hated it, and that my youngest is so young, so she will have to deal with it for much longer than I did...and it appears like she will go through much more than I did. Just makes me feel awful!

GillyG
29th May 2009, 09:51 PM
I appreciate the welcome, and your kind words. It's just hard to watch your kids go through anything like this knowing how much I hated it, and that my youngest is so young, so she will have to deal with it for much longer than I did...and it appears like she will go through much more than I did. Just makes me feel awful!

I can fully understand you feeling like this but, on the positive side, she will almost certainly have a better outcome than you did and suffer less pain as she gets older if she has the appropriate treatment while she's young - so it's not all bad :D I'm not trying to trivialise your feelings in any way, just trying to help you put a positive spin on things :spin:

sunnyday04_kids
29th May 2009, 10:06 PM
Gilly,

I don't feel trivialized in any way...I appreciate everyone trying to help. It is nice to have people to talk to that have gone through this (or are going through it with us).

Thank you!
Nikki

mark
29th May 2009, 10:18 PM
Hi Nikki, i'm one of those feels that the genetics thing is defo a big factor in my case, all the first born in the family on my mums side have been ravaged with Kyhosis, my gran was a first born, my mum was a first born and i am a first born, now to me thats a genetic link as the odds must be astronomic or where hell of an unlucky family

Welcome to sso, i'm glad you found us, where a realtively friendly, quirky bunch who just want to help help help

I hope your enjoying the site

mark

France & Amelia
7th June 2009, 09:03 PM
Hi

My 13 year old daughter was diagnosed with scoliosis in March this year. Well, actually I diagnosed it myself first as I noticed she had a right-hand rib hump. At the time I thought, I wonder if it is hereditory as I was diagnosed with it when I was about 12. Unfortunately I do not recall a conversation when I was 12 as to it being hereditory? Not sure there ever was one but that was a long time ago now.

So I have it and now she does, to me that equals hereditory! Mine was only diagnosed as I had a medical prior to testing out a nuclear fallout shelter in the early 80's (long story). Otherwise it would have probably gone undetected for years/possibly never. They used to do routine medicals in schools which included the 'touch your toes' test for spine abnormalities.
Unfortunately....................... I believe those days to be long gone and it is probably all down to cost cutting I should imagine. This angers me immensely as there are so many people who have never heard of scoliosis so would not routinely check their children on the off-chance. It was only because I knew I had it that I made a point of taking my daughter to the GP as soon as I spotted her right-hand pertruding rib cage. However, I wish I was informed of the possibility it could be hereditory as I would have paid my daughters spines far more attention from an earlier age. I had no idea. Would not of put me off from having children though. Luckily, I have never had any physical pain or major problems with mine, I only realise Im a bit wonky when Im in shop changing rooms with mirrors which show all angles. Oh and sometimes clothes do not fit as great as they could. Ive climbed mountains and all sorts.

According to some articles I have read, by the time you spot the abnormaility it is often a little late. Great, so I didnt know it could be hereditory, so I didnt pay her back attention and only noticed it by the time the curve had progressed a bit too much?! That did make me feel ignorant/ and cheated of information. I regularly check my younger daughter now (she's 11) and I would really prefer if they x-rayed her too sooner rather than later. Im not over paranoid, just somewhat cautious. My moto is 'better to have and not need than need and not have'. Im going to request it and see what they say. At least I will be safe in the knowledge that I tried everything I could as early as possible.

Ive never had an epidural though, Im actually 30 weeks pregnant myself and have contemplated it too. I have not had surgery though. But I do not know the angle of my curve. I do not think I was ever told? I just had to have xrays every year or so until I was about 18. Now im not sure whether this was because either the curve was not significant enough or again cost cutting??? Quite keen to find out the angle now that I know they measure them. Nobody told me anything, it was only noticed again recently when I had to have a chest x-ray for a scuba-diving medical. They didnt say I couldnt dive but did say it may effect my lung capacity. I did find putting on the heavy tanks on by back a bit much though so have decided to become more of a snorkeller instead!

Sorry, Im rambling.................. hope the above helps a little

greenhouse12
7th June 2009, 10:32 PM
Hi

I think genetics has a role in scoliosis but there is a good chance your child wont be affected . My dad has scoliosis and kyphosis but milder than mine , my 2 aunts on my dads side have kyphosisi and my great aunt had terrible scoliosis or kyphosis apperently , although i havent been affected by kyphosis :]

I hope your pregnancy goes well and your baby is healthy

Mustang Sal
8th June 2009, 12:24 AM
Hi

Quite keen to find out the angle now that I know they measure them.

Hi Frances,

I too was never actually told my curve degrees (I didn't know anything about cob angles either) but have since found out because I got copies of my medical notes a few years ago - mine was about 40 when I was 15, but no idea what it is now (I suspect it's more than that - one of the questions on my list for my surgeon). Is there any way you could apply for copies of your notes? Even if you get checked out now and find out the degree measurement, it could still be helpful for you to know what it used to be.