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View Full Version : Non-surgical treatment for scoliosis??


sarahsmum
13th December 2008, 09:33 PM
Hello everyone.
I was just googling scoliosis when i found this clinic, its called the Scoliosis SOS Clinic and its in Suffolk. Its the only one in the UK. It offers a treatment for patients who have scoliosis called 'ScolioGold'. After reading through the website i've got to say that it sounds very promising, the results it shows are really fab espiecally as they have been acquired without any surgery.
I wanted to ask if anyone has heard of this clinic or treatment or if anyone has any experience with this? The clinic offers a free consultation.
The web address for this clinic is www.scoliosissos.com

Thankyou all in advance

GillyG
13th December 2008, 11:16 PM
I've moved this thread into here since it's specifically about non-surgical treatments. If you search this forum you'll find we have had many discussions about this particular clinic!

Amazed Jean
14th December 2008, 12:01 AM
I think it's all been said here before.

sarahsmum
16th December 2008, 12:09 PM
I've moved this thread into here since it's specifically about non-surgical treatments. If you search this forum you'll find we have had many discussions about this particular clinic!

Thankyyou Gilly.
I am afraid although i have looked through this forum i have not found any discussions that you refer to. I did come across one or two threads, by caro and doodii who have both had good experiences with the clinic but my daugthers curve measurement is much more than theirs and she is at that stage where she still has lots of growing to do.
I really wanted to know if there is anyone who has had experience with this clinic when they were my daughters age, or any parent with a child in a similiar situation. I know that caro mentions that while she had her treatment there were younger girls there who had better results.
I am really sorry for bothering you guys again and again but iam really really confused and i don't know what to do or what to think.
We have been told that Sarah needs to have a posterior correction of scoliosis T2-L1?!?!? I don't even know what that means. Mr Sell only said that she needs to have surgery, he didn't explain the surgery procedure.

I am sorry again for being so THICK!

I thankyou all for advice and kind words

Nusrat

BeckyH
16th December 2008, 06:04 PM
hi nusrat,

firstly, i don't think you're thick. i went into theatre not really having a clue what they were going to do to me (apart from hopefully fixing me! ok and i exaggerated, i knew that metalwork was involved) but i know other people like to know more.

what your doctor is recommending is that your daughter have a spinal release and fusion (some choose to do this in two stages, others do it all at once, you'd need to ask the doctor). the release part means that they'll remove the inter-vertebral discs (i always think of these as being like cartilege, i don't know if i'm right in that!) and manipulate the spine straight. the fusion bit is screwing in the metal, to hold the spine in place whilst the bone graft (in the uk, the most common method of bone grafting is to take some of the patient's own rib) solidifies. surgeries vary greatly in length, but full recovery takes six months to a year (towards the 6 month end of the scale for patients in their teens).

when they mention T2 to L1, this means the vertebrae involved. your surgeon is proposing quite a long fusion for your daughter but this is what i'd believe to be pretty standard for a scoli correction. here is an image which gives you an idea of which vertebrae are which: http://www.advancedchiropracticcenter.com/images/spine.gif

essentially, we have 17 vertebrae between shoulders and hips. although what your surgeon is proposing is a significant amount of verts, once the surgery is done, your daughter should recover fine and will adapt to her new spine.

now to the other issue: non-surgical treatments. this style of treatment doesn't suit everyone. part of the problem with scoliosis is that nobody knows what causes most cases, so it's difficult to develop a treatment other than the aggressive surgical approach. non-surgical treatments demand a huge committment from the patient, which is a lifelong thing, so shouldn't be entered into lightly. there are various opinions from doctors and physiotherapists on how effective they are, and my perception is that they are fairly good at reducing pain and building up various muscles in patients with smaller curves. i must stress that this is very much my opinion, but i don't personally believe that the anatomical structure of someone's spine who has a significant curvature (40* plus) is going to change through the use of exercise.

the other issue a lot of people find with the non-surgical therapies is that they can be very expensive but do not offer anything in terms of a guaranteed payoff (surgery, you pretty much know you'll get a good result, non-surgical being so unproven, they can't promise anything). so if it works, then it's fantastic, but if not, people may be very disappointed.

if you are interested, i'd suggest you pay a visit to the clinic and see what you think of it. however, the other option is to do what many of us do and contact the surgeon with a list of questions. ask for more detail on the surgery, ask any questions you want (when i was going through this my mum was obsessed with the surgery affecting my ability to have a normal pregnancy/birth later in life - FYI, it shouldn't - and i thought that was a stupid question to ask but she did anyway). ask anything. it takes a lot of persistence sometimes but you're entitled to know, so ask.

good luck.

BeckyH
16th December 2008, 06:07 PM
just to add, i did a quick search for the clinic and it very helpfully excluded the term "SOS" from the search. i'll ask titch if anything can be done about that. in the meantime nusrat, you may wish to search for "scoliogold" or other terms relating to the clinic in order to try and find our previous discussions on the topic :)

titch
16th December 2008, 10:15 PM
Hmm. I *think* there is an exception system for the searching (if you allow it to index everything, no matter how few letters, you get a vast database so the default for full text searching is for it to be limited to 4 letters and above). I'll have to have a look at this and see if I can sort it out.

sarahsmum
19th December 2008, 06:37 PM
Thankyou Becky so much for all your kind words and the time you have taken to explain everything, very well i must add. Before reading your post i must say that i was very confused about the whole scoliosis surgery process. I have been doing some reading but i must admit part of me wants to block everything out and although i have seen Mr Sell twice both times i have gone blank. And my husband, well he might has well not be there!! lol.
For the last 6 months or so i have had days where i am totally fretting and days where i block everything out.
Like i said you explained everything really well and i am now doing some more reading on the spine and scoliosis.
Regarding the non surgical treatments, you are right they are not for everyone and what suits one person might not suit another. And because my daughters curve is so big i wasn't sure whether it would be right for her, although they have told me when i rang them that they have had patients whos curves have been near 100*.
I am waiting for some information through the post from them and then i probably will go for the free consultation to have a look around for myself, and then i think i might be able to decide after that. Thankyou very much again, becky.
Titch, I searched the forum again and found some more threads which i read through with alot of interest. There was one thread that Mark posted on and he mentioned about 8 or 10 other threads where this treatment has been discussed but when i tried to go on those threads the computer wouldn't let me. I have tried many times but each time its the same thing. I don't whether its my computer or something else, it would be greatly appreciated if you would let me know.

I must add this site is a godsend, a lifesaver.
I have no one else to talk to about this and i think all of you are absolutely fab.
Thankyou everyone again for all the support you provide for everyone.
God bless you all.

jifi
20th December 2008, 03:43 PM
Hi Sarasmum,
I am a 'scoliotic' German, who has visited the Katharina Schroth clinic 4 times, one time a year since I was 14 years old. As there seems to be not many informations on the web in English, and surgery seems to be done more often compared to what I saw in Germany, I want to write a bit about the "Schroth-view" on scoliosis treatment.

Aim of Schroth's treatment is to stop or slow down the progression of a curve and that patients have and mentain a good quality of live, which means no limitations or pain due to scoliosis. This is reached by exersices that stretch/extend and de-rotate the back (as a picure in mind: doing the exact oppoite of how the actual posture looks like & stretching), intensive muscular training to keep the posture (specially building up those muscles that are underdeveloped because of scoliosis), breathing techniques and bracing, if needed - depending of course on the severness of the curve. As a patient you become also very sensitive to your posture in everyday live and learn how to 'correct yourself ' in several situations. (Yes, it is a lot of work - at Schroth's exercises are a ful-time job and at home its even more than just 30 minutes dayly as one has to take care about the posture permanantly. But being at Schroth's was quite fun for me - meeting a lot of people at my age and no school for 6 weeks - and I learned so much about my anatomy, that I think I am able to help myself should I ever be in pain.)

Schroth's general view on surgery is that one abnormal condition is replaced by another - as the spine is straight but stiff after surgery - and curved but flexible before. So they have boths pro and cons. 'Schroths' seem to be very sceptical about long-term results of surgeries though. In general surgery is seen as a last option when the 'conservative' methods of intensive exersices/ Schroth training and bracing are not sufficient and the partient suffers pain or there is a risk of loung or heart dysfunction. Of course it is depending on each spine and a lot of other physical conditions, but after the scoliosis has reached higher degrees, it wont be straightened like it would be by a surgery when doing a Schroth treatment. But I think this is not nessesary and the only problem with this might just be cosmetical one - of course posture improoves fantastically with a lot of training, but the muscles cant pull the bones that straight like a metal piece can do(e.g. I have more than cobb 65 T + three other curves that have lesser - I must confess I didnt do x-rays since ages, but will take care of this next year. I do not have any pain and my posture looks good for the spines degrees, when I told a new friend that knows how scoliosis looks like on one of her relatives, she sayed she didnt notice that I have one.)

Braces in the English-speaking regions seem to be as well different from what I experienced in Germany. Usually the recomended braces for youths are made to measure and are 'over-correcting' (eg. a person with a sraight back will get a back deformation to the opposite direction trying such a patients brace. I had a Cheneau brace). X-rayed in-brace the spine is corrected about several degrees (I am not sure but I think it was about 30 instead of 50 thoraic in my case), but one need muscles to keep this result without brace! Braces usually have to be worn 23h a day - so only exceptions are taking a shower and doing exersises - and should be carefully re-trained after the person stops growing.

Last but not least, I really must say I was very lucky that my parents found out about Schroth. When I was diagnosed scoliosis by a screening in primary school we went to an orthopaedist that didnt do anything -even not x-rays. I started treatment years later when I was 14, because my partents saw that my back was not ok and they searched for something I could do. On my first x-ray the scoliosis had reached about 50 in the worst curve. I'm sorry but I am not sure about all the numbers anymore, I hope to find some old x-rays when I am back to my family for christmas.

Hui, I really hope that my English is understandable. If you ve got any questions feel free to ask!

All the best for you and your daughter (btw - how old is she?),
Janin