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carolad
3rd July 2008, 04:35 PM
I've been working quite hard on my pilates/core stability exercises and am finally seeing the results - much to my amazement I have started to develop muscles where I never had them before :)

The strange thing is that they aren't where I expected them to be! I had always thought the 'core muscles' were around the stomach area, but the muscles I've developed are actually much lower down - more around the hip area than the stomach.

Bit of a pointless post this really...but I just wanted to share my surprise at having muscles appear in a completely different place than I was expecting! :hunny:

tonibunny
3rd July 2008, 04:44 PM
:D Congrats!! How long did it take you before you noticed a difference?

I think my core stability muscles must be pretty good, I've been doing pelvic floor exercises since I was a young teenager and I can do sit-ups without bending my back whatsoever, just by drawing myself up with these muscles. The muscles on the outside of my body are all flobbery and rubbish though :D

carolad
3rd July 2008, 05:13 PM
Hi Tonibunny

Yes, it sounds like you have good core stability there :D

I've been doing some pilates exercises for about 3 months, but only started working hard at it (ie doing it every day and working the muscles a bit harder) about 6 weeks ago. Its only in the last couple of weeks that I've really been able to see a difference. So I suppose in answer to your question, it probably took about 4 weeks of working at it consistently to get results.

But like you, my 'stomach' muscles are still a bit wobbly, even though my core muscles below that have tightened up!

I was pleased because my physio said she could see I had good core muscles when she examined me. Although she did say that I should be engaging these muscles ALL THE TIME, which surprised me. I find this very difficult to do without tensing my whole body, so I'm not sure if this just takes time to perfect.

tonibunny
3rd July 2008, 05:36 PM
I actually started doing the pelvic floor exercises after suffering from stress incontinence in silence for years following my surgery when I was 10. I was too embarrassed to tell anyone! Then I read about these exercises in Woman's Weekly or something.....and got it under control. A few years later I realised that these exercises have even more benefits, and I felt quite smug that I'd been doing them for years ;) :angel:

I'm not embarrassed to mention the stress incontinence now, because there may be other kids out there who have this problem and I want them to know that it isn't their fault and they can PM me if this is something that is affecting them too :)

MOB
3rd July 2008, 07:31 PM
I went for a back massage last week and Karen (person who give me massage) has noticed that my back muscles are changing due to Pilates.
MOB

crkcallie
4th July 2008, 07:49 AM
Congratulations on your exercises and them helping you get into shape. I do a yoga routine every day and one of the exercises is to hang upside down. I do sit ups from hanging completely upside down and I have developed some pretty strong abdominal muscles.

Patricia
4th July 2008, 03:06 PM
Exercise is great – it’s amazing what it can do for your back :D

carolad
4th July 2008, 04:00 PM
The only disappointing thing is I haven't noticed any difference in my back pain...Maybe it will just take a bit longer for me to feel the benefit. I'll keep at it anyway, and see what happens...

crimsonrose - Yoga is something else I've started to do. And I have to say I think some of the yoga stretches DO make me feel better - not long term, but straight afterwards I don't feel as stiff and sore as usual. So I think this is also worth keeping up.

And then of course there are my general fitness exercises at the gym to do as well...I feel like I'm spending all my spare time exercising these days :D Although that is a good thing, because it means I don't have so much time to feel sorry for myself, and I think there is a definite 'feelgood factor' that comes with doing exercise.

tonibunny - that must have been awful for you when you were only 10. Isn't it great that you managed to sort out that particular problem AND help with your core stability too?

tonibunny
4th July 2008, 04:28 PM
Hi Carolad, would you mind if I moved this to the Non-Surgical Forum as it belongs better there than in the General forum? :)

You had great results with the Alexander Technique too didn't you - how would you say that compares to doing Pilates?

I just have to find out a way to tone my "outer" abs and I'll be chuffed to bits :D

carolad
4th July 2008, 04:44 PM
tonibunny - yes, good idea to move to Non-Surgical Forum (I should really think of the best place to post before just starting to ramble on ;))

I would say in terms of how I feel that the Alexander Technique has been of more benefit to me than pilates. AT has definitely helped me in terms of walking and moving around in general. Unfortunately it hasn't made any difference to sitting, which is what I find most uncomfortable.

There are certainly some things that both pilates and AT have in common - 'neutral' pelvis, weight evenly distributed throughout the body etc. The one major difference is the pilates emphasis on 'holding in' your core muscles - AT is the opposite - its about letting go of all the muscle tension in your body, letting your insides completely relax... My AT teacher was actually quite anti-pilates for this reason.

Very confusing, when different practitioners tell you different things! I suppose you just have to go along with what works best for you. So although I'm doing my pilates/core stability exercises, I'm going for the AT 'letting go' approach the rest of the time.

violasmith
6th July 2008, 12:24 PM
Hi everyone. I'm reading this thread with great interest. I think any exercise that focusses on deep muscle work is really good. I did Alexander Technique in my 20's (I was a music student then and we all got involved in it because of pain/strain problems in playing technique). I found it really helpful, and in particular it made me aware of where hips, shoulders, head etc should be in relation to each other. I don't know if any of you guys feel this about your scoliosis, but mine has left me with a very strange idea of what is level, straight, in balance etc (whether it's me, a picture, parking a car - you name it, I think it's straight and then I look at it properly and oh dear!)

Now, after trying many things over the years, I do bits of everything. Stretches, weights (not heavy ones though!!), treadmill, posture stuff and breathing exercises with it all. I do still though get pain and I still get big relapses (just in one now).

With this latest relapse, I have to say that there is a distinct difference between muscle and related pain, and another pain, which seems to be coming from the vertebrae themselves.

Does anyone here get rib hump pain/tingling. I do frequently, and I haven't found anything yet that tackles this. Any ideas anyone?

tonibunny
6th July 2008, 12:35 PM
Viola!! Are you called viola because you play the viola?! Because I do too.....except I can't at the moment because it hurts my back too much :( This is mainly because I have a structural problem with my back that needs medical treatment, but when I'm better I would really very much like to study the Alexander Technique.

I know that a lot of music schools teach the Alexander Technique (and Yehudi Menuhin was really into it so they taught it at his school). I think it will be strange for me because I have had bad scoliosis since I was a baby so I have no concept of how it feels to be sitting "properly", but I'm keen to learn :)

I also play the oboe, and have been told I can have a place at Guildhall to do their Music Therapy masters course if I can get my piano skills up to Grade 5. I'd love to do that next year so I have a lot to work towards! I need to know that playing my instruments won't cause continuing pain and problems though, because I'll be changing careers from a desk based job for just that reason. If it looks like it will then I'll probably train as a teacher instead.

violasmith
6th July 2008, 12:58 PM
Viola!! Are you called viola because you play the viola?! Because I do too.....except I can't at the moment because it hurts my back too much :( This is mainly because I have a structural problem with my back that needs medical treatment, but when I'm better I would really very much like to study the Alexander Technique.
I also play the oboe, and have been told I can have a place at Guildhall to do their Music Therapy masters course if I can get my piano skills up to Grade 5. I'd love to do that next year so I have a lot to work towards! I need to know that playing my instruments won't cause continuing pain and problems though, because I'll be changing careers from a desk based job for just that reason. If it looks like it will then I'll probably train as a teacher instead.


Indeed, I do play the viola. It took a lot of pain to find the 'correct' posture - like you because I couldn't work out/ didn't know what that felt like. People (doctors) are split as to whether I should play it, but as it's my life, I know what I'm going to do!!! I've not played for about 6 months because of the pain and nerve problems I have been having, but I'm getting back to it now. Alexander is very good - it doesn't do stuff like change your world overnight, but it does make you more aware of it (well that's what I found), and that is the key to finding the correct way for you.



My advice is go for it. Don't stop yourself from doing things on the basis that something might happen. I think that as non wonky folk get pain sometimes from playing (usually due to tension) then it is silly to assume we may not. However, if you are really aware of your body, you can make adjustments, and hopefully be able to deal with the tensions playing will cause if you let it. I think music therapy is the most wonderful thing in the world - practice those scales and arpeggios (mentally if not physically).
As for teaching - instrumental teaching is fun; class teaching is the most demanding job in the world (and I'm not exaggerating). I'm not working at the moment, but intend to go back to school in September, but probably very part time. You cant have a quiet day in the classroom (and particularly not a music classroom)!!. If you want any more info/advice please PM me - would love to talk more viola.

Nic

tonibunny
6th July 2008, 01:05 PM
Ah, brilliant! It's so cool to have another viola player at SSO :D I'm not of a really high standard, so I couldn't actually teach instrumental lessons - I'm grade 7-8 on both instruments, but that's all they need for the Music Therapy course and they're happy with my standard. It's the piano that's the prob - I am just learning now!

I'll PM you, I have to go out right now but I'll be in touch :D

carolad
7th July 2008, 01:03 PM
Violasmith - Thats really interesting to hear about your experience of AT as a musician. AT is great at making you much more aware of what your body is doing and of the various imbalances and muscles pulling you further out of alignment.

I think your approach of 'doing a bit of everything' is probably a good one - best not to get too fixated on one particular exercise or therapy, but just take bits from each in the hope that you will get some benefit.

By the way, its great to see what a talented bunch we have here, with all this musical ability....maybe you should start up a SSO orchestra :D

alyssa
7th July 2008, 01:29 PM
Can I just say that I LOVE pilates, I really do it's done so much for me and my pain. It's a great thing to do to keep your core stability muscles strong and stable. I find that I am very weak and find it tiring to hold myself up sometimes but when I've done my excercises I feel refreshed and stronger, it's amazing really.

</randomness!>

Bows
7th July 2008, 11:16 PM
Hi Alyssa,
Just wondered how your pain is now, i guess you wont be having the injections again! im waiting for some more, but was just hoping that your pain was a bit better.
I have just been to pilates tonight, sometimes i think its helpfull, sometimes i think it makes my back in more pain, i think the trouble with me is i just do what the rest of the class does as best as i can even though it hurts alot, maybe i should'nt, its difficult to know what to do for the best sometimes isnt it.
Bows x

carolad
8th July 2008, 10:34 AM
I have just been to pilates tonight, sometimes i think its helpfull, sometimes i think it makes my back in more pain, i think the trouble with me is i just do what the rest of the class does as best as i can even though it hurts alot, maybe i should'nt, its difficult to know what to do for the best sometimes isnt it.
Bows x

Hi Bows

I know what you mean - I definitely felt the pilates was making my pain worse when I first started doing it. I think the problem was I was trying too hard - just take it easy to start with, don't try too hard to contract your core muscles and if something hurts, just take a break for a while.

Doing pilates no longer causes me pain in the way it did at the start, although I'm still not convinced it has done anything to reduce my pain levels. I'm determined to persist with it though because so many people have said it has helped with their pain. Maybe it will just take a bit longer to have that effect...

violasmith
8th July 2008, 08:18 PM
Violasmith - Thats really interesting to hear about your experience of AT as a musician. AT is great at making you much more aware of what your body is doing and of the various imbalances and muscles pulling you further out of alignment.

I think your approach of 'doing a bit of everything' is probably a good one - best not to get too fixated on one particular exercise or therapy, but just take bits from each in the hope that you will get some benefit.

By the way, its great to see what a talented bunch we have here, with all this musical ability....maybe you should start up a SSO orchestra :D

AT is great for that (imbalance etc), I think awareness is really important in scoliosis. It's not knowing that can cause even more tension (and that can't be a good thing).
As for the orchestra - now there's an idea. I wonder how many other muso's there are on this site?

Bows
8th July 2008, 09:32 PM
I will keep going with the Pilates and see what happens. Whats AT do you need to be a musical for AT or am I missing something:doh:
Bows

mark
8th July 2008, 10:09 PM
Hi Bows, no, anyone can do AT, its something i meant to look into, haven't yet, yes i know i'm lazy, eeks, i love music got thousands of records, had a guitar a couple of years now but never got round to learning, yes i know i'm lazy, anybody know of a good left handed guitar teacher

Bows
8th July 2008, 10:19 PM
Hi Mark,
Just been reading your posts you are so articutate. Please excuse my ingorance what is AT?

mark
8th July 2008, 10:51 PM
Hi Bows

Thanks, i wish i was more articulate, AT stands for Alexander Technique

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexander_Technique

here's a link to wikipedia

I hope it helps

mark

GillyG
8th July 2008, 11:16 PM
anybody know of a good left handed guitar teacher

My OH and both kids are complete lefties (whereas I'm a bit of both :p) and all three play guitar left handed :D

titch
9th July 2008, 11:18 AM
Any teacher worth their salt can teach a lefty just as easily as a righty - not that I play as such, having had all of about 4 or 5 lessons many moons ago before running out of money, nevertheless for all that I'm right handed for most things, I just cannot for the life of me even think of playing guitar right handed. The guy that gave me a few lessons had absolutely no problems with teaching me, and I didn't find it any difficulty to translate what he was doing to what I should be doing :)