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Dismantled
5th June 2008, 01:51 AM
Has anyone tried this? I just went for my first session yesterday. Since I have no muscle on my left side, it's supposed to help build it up. The cups have needles inside them that lightly penetrate (I can't really feel them) I don't really see the point of this since the problem is with my bones, but I'm curious to see if anyone tried this

My back is full of dark blue bruises =(

tonibunny
5th June 2008, 05:38 PM
Hi,

Where did you go to have this treatment done? As far as I know, there is no real evidence that cupping can help any sort of medical condition or illness apart from stimulating the flow of blood, which might give slight pain relief. I especially don't see how it could build up the muscle - only exercise can do that. But, I'd like to learn more! :)

mark
13th June 2008, 04:29 PM
Suction Cupping Therapy
Cupping involves creating a vacuum in a suction cup over various parts of the body for therapeutic effects. The classical method of cupping was to briefly heating the air in an inverted cup, which then produces a vacuum when the air cools after the cup is quickly applied to the skin. The resultant low pressure under the cup causes a localized expansion of tissue, which produces a profound vasodilatation reaction.

Suction cupping is used therapeutically to draw blood flow to areas of ischemic pain, thus flushing capillary beds and re-supplying vital nutrients. Suction also mobilizes and stretches soft tissue by pulling it up and away from underlying structures, thus loosening areas of adhesion or restriction and activating muscle spindle reflexes that relax contractile tissue.

Suction cups are typically placed locally over disease/injury sites, and retained or manipulated for 5-10 minutes. Topical application of an oil-based lubricant to the skin just prior to cup application facilitates a tight seal, and allows for sliding cups around in the treatment area.



Moxibustion Therapy
The classic method of heat therapy in Chinese medicine is known as "moxibustion." Moxibustion refers to the combustion of "moxa:" preparations of dried medicinal herbs, principally Artemesia vulgaris (mugwort). Focused local heat is delivered via ignition of wand-shaped moxa rolls held above the skin, or by small cones of moxa placed over a protective medium. Regional heating is accomplished through placement of ignited moxa in protective chambers that are held or placed over larger body areas. Moxibustion is normally applied for 5-10 minutes only, and in all cases precautions are taken to ensure that overheating or burning does not occur.

The high resin content of moxa makes for high-temperature combustion and deep penetration of heat. The clinical effects of moxibustion are similar to those of other heat therapies (such as the increased cellular metabolism, vascular flow, and relaxation of contractile tissue, etc. that is observed with hot packs, therapeutic ultrasound, infrared heat, etc.). In addition, the signature wavelength spectrum emitted by moxibustion may account for ancient use in Chinese medicine.

Enhancement of acupuncture effects through heat and suction cupping.
Heat and suction cupping therapies may be used alone, or to enhance the effects of acupuncture. Heat and reduction of ambient pressure both lower the threshold for generation of propriospinal reflexes through needle stimulation of muscle spindles. The activation of such reflexes is signaled through the inducement of propagated sensation (see "Acupuncture Mechanisms of Action"). Heat and suction cupping may thus be used synergistically with needling to evoke the propriospinal responses that facilitate muscle relaxation.



These are practice's that have been known to leave the patient in considerably more pain than they went in with. I come across it professionaly from time to time. It can leave quite nasty burns if not carried out correctly

mark

crkcallie
30th June 2008, 03:27 AM
I have never heard of this treatment and I have never done it before.