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pistonpopper
10th July 2007, 12:22 AM
Hi, new member here. I am now 51 years old but was diagnosed with Congenital Idopathac (sp?) Scoliosis & Kyphosis when I was 11 (1967) and was finally operated on in June 1970 (when I was 14) at Stanmore, Middlesex, UK by Mr C.W. Manning. I had the 'risser jacket' treatment, then Harrington Rod (T4-L2) insertion and the usual graft, post op plaster jackets and the Milwalke Brace.

My interest in this site is to gain a liitle knowledge into what are the long term orthapedic effects of the above on the individual. We will leave the emotional and other effects aside for now...

Hi to all
Regards,
Peter.

RugbyLaura
10th July 2007, 12:38 AM
Hi Peter,

Sorry, I have nothing constructive to say. But being a pedant I have to point out that I don't think you can have Congenital Idiopathic scoliosis. I thought that they were mutually exclusive. Correct me if I'm wrong.

XX

pistonpopper
10th July 2007, 12:47 AM
Originally posted by RugbyLaura@Jul 9 2007, 10:38 PM
Hi Peter,

Sorry, I have nothing constructive to say. But being a pedant I have to point out that I don't think you can have Congenital Idiopathic scoliosis. I thought that they were mutually exclusive. Correct me if I'm wrong.

XX
You may well be correct, I am just quoting what I beleive was on a letter that I had sight of some months ago from some Social Services files that I obtained on me from the late 60's and early 70's.

From what I recall of something else I read from the same files, someone translated it in a letter for some other 3rd party as 'at birth and not known why'.

I remember a great deal about my experience from that time (1970) but some of the accurate medical jargon and descriptions, I have to rely on what I have read in these Social Services files (which are being copied for me as we speak) so I will have to hand soon some of the letters between Stanmore and the Head of ESCC at the time.

P.

Amazed Jean
10th July 2007, 06:24 AM
Hello Peter, Welcome to SSO. Having never had surgery or bracing I cannot be of much help but I wish you welcome. Many of us know quite well about the emotional and other effects quite well when you get to wanting to chat about those. We are usually right here hugging someone who needs it.

RugbyLaura
10th July 2007, 08:34 AM
Peter,

Sorry, have just re-read my post. I meant to be funny but ended up sounding like a pompous twit. ~What I should have said was :welcome: . Still nothing constructive to say though!

Laura X

titch
10th July 2007, 10:14 AM
There is a distinct confusion caused by the specifics of the medical jargon relating to scoliosis. In the case of most conditions, congenital simply means "born with it", but in scoliosis it is more specific. If you're born with it, it will still only be classed as congenital if there are certain visible and specific vertebral anomalies - if those are not present, it's referred to as infantile idiopathic (idiopathic meaning no known reason) scoliosis.

I see you're asking about long term orthopaedic effects - can I ask if you're having problems with your back, or that you believe to stem from it?

In any case, :welcome2: :-)

tonibunny
10th July 2007, 10:25 AM
Hey Peter, welcome to SSO! :welcome2:

I was also treated at Stanmore, and I have a feeling that my surgeon Mr Edgar was trained by Mr Manning :-) I started seeing Mr Edgar in 1976 when I was a baby, but I think Mr Manning had retired by then (if he's the chap I'm thinking of).

I had Infantile Idiopathic Scoliosis and wore Risser casts as a baby, and then had Milwaukee braces during the summer months and casts in the winter from the age of 3 or 4. I had my first surgery when I was 10.

Since you were first diagnosed at 11 it sounds like you probably had Congenital Scoliosis, otherwise it would have been impossible to have said that you had scoliosis since you were a baby - by that age you'd have been classed as having had Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis instead. No-one knows why some children get Congenital Scoliosis though, which might be why you heard the word "idiopathic" being said. Anyway, it doesn't really matter now! The point is that you have been through treatment and surgery and that you're here now so we can give you friendship, support and info :-)

Welcome again! :D

Toni xx

GillyG
10th July 2007, 03:48 PM
Hey Peter :welcome:

Well, I'm definitely in the same age group - I turned 50 in May this year - but I only actually had surgery for my scoliosis last year at 49!!

I hope, reading between the lines, you aren't having too many problems with your Harrington rod surgery. The more I think about it, the more I feel lucky that I didn't have the surgery before, the instrumentation and techniques have come on a long way since the 70's

Anyway, I'm pleased you found the site and look forward to hearing more about you when you feel ready. I think you'll find we are a very friendly and supportive bunch. :D

Gilly xx

sins
10th July 2007, 05:15 PM
Hi peter and welcome,
I'm 39 and living with large curves as a result of less than optimal treatment for infantile scoliosis.Loking forward to hearing more from you.

Mac
10th July 2007, 09:41 PM
Hi Peter,
I'm another Harrington rod patient. Operated on in 1979 in Liverpool. Original rod still in place, just started in last couple of years to experience wear and tear. :welcome:

andrea
11th July 2007, 02:34 PM
Hi Peter and welcome. I can't help at all with the long-term effects of scoliosis, as my daughter is just 4 (nearly 5). We are Stanmore patients to and I have little doubt that she is cast on the same table as you were when a child.

We're a friendly bunch, so hope you enjoy your visits here.
Andrea x

Little Ali
11th July 2007, 08:14 PM
Hi Peter! :welcome2:

pistonpopper
11th July 2007, 11:39 PM
Originally posted by Mac@Jul 10 2007, 07:41 PM
Hi Peter,
I'm another Harrington rod patient. Operated on in 1979 in Liverpool. Original rod still in place, just started in last couple of years to experience wear and tear. :welcome:

Would you care to elborate on what you call 'wear and tear' please.

As I had my corrective treatment and sugery done some 37 years ago, I am hoping to possiblely discuss with some other like situation individuals who have also been through the mill (sorry process and god was it one then - 5 months I was in Stanmore for in one stretch!) what thier long term post-op effects are (or not hopefully).

To all - Thanks for all the Welcomes.

P.

pistonpopper
11th July 2007, 11:41 PM
Originally posted by RugbyLaura@Jul 10 2007, 06:34 AM
Peter,

Sorry, have just re-read my post. I meant to be funny but ended up sounding like a pompous twit. ~What I should have said was :welcome: . Still nothing constructive to say though!

Laura X

I am a big boy, don't worry about it 8)

P.

RugbyLaura
12th July 2007, 12:50 AM
QUOTE I am a big boy, "don't worry about it" P. Thank goodness, I've been feeling soooo bad.

"I am a big boy"

Sounds interesting :glee:
XX

Amazed Jean
12th July 2007, 02:34 AM
Oh Peter, I forgot to mention that we are a very wonky bunch too.
We will definitely be a bad influence on you if we get the chance. We never miss the chance to be just a bit naughty .

pistonpopper
12th July 2007, 10:31 AM
Originally posted by Amazed Jean@Jul 12 2007, 12:34 AM
Oh Peter, I forgot to mention that we are a very wonky bunch too.
We will definitely be a bad influence on you if we get the chance. We never miss the chance to be just a bit naughty .

So I am learning quite quickly. I am glad I did not have the handle "Big Boy Popper".. Jeez, what would you all have done then !!!!!!

I am quite happy to be surounded by individuals who may be a little 'off the wall' and as far as I am concerned, a little flirtation never hurts anybody and does my ego at 51 a power of good 8)

You wish to be a bad influence on me.. please, Please, PLEASE :-)

P.

tonibunny
12th July 2007, 10:32 AM
Hey Peter, the main problem that sometimes happens to people who had fusions a long time ago is that the remaining discs at the top and bottom of the fusion can begin to wear, because they are taking all the strain that would usually be shared along the whole of the spine.

The longer your fusion, the fewer remaining discs you have and the more stress those discs have to take.

It's usually the lumbar discs that cause problems, as they take more stress and strain. Worn discs can bulge or herniate, pressing on nerves and causing pain.

Hope that helps! :-)

Toni xx

sins
12th July 2007, 11:49 AM
In my case wear and tear on a 24 year old fusion amounts to degenerated discs in ny neck and some low grade arthritic changes in the lower spine.It's all manageable and if your spine is fused and you are currently pain free, chances are that you will continue to be so.
Sins

Mac
12th July 2007, 04:39 PM
Hi Peter,
What I meant by wear and tear is....
For the previous years I have had not experienced much with the rod, just the odd cricked neck which I found was elleviated by exercises and would right itself. I've had 2 normal births, been nursing since 1982 and just gone about my business really.
I am 44 now and in the last couple of years have had an extremely stiff lower back which I have found out is due to worn L3, I was sent to a wonderful physio by my consultant and with his hands on treatment and my keeping up with the gym the problem is under control.
In the last 4 weeks I am now getting problems above the fusion so will be back to my trusty physio again and hopefully get that back to "normal".
My consultant has said last resort is to fuse lower down the spine etc if things get too bad, but I am hoping to hold out as long as possible as long as I am reasonably pain free {take diclofenac 75mg-150mg dasily}.

pistonpopper
13th July 2007, 10:28 AM
Thanks for your comments on long term fusion and problems encountered of currently being encountered. In my own case, with the fusion of 37 years, I am possibly seeing the onset of some problems but I donlt know wether they are caused (a) by the fusion itself or (b) old age.

1. I find I can't stand for any length of period now (>10 mins) without suffering pain oin the lower back below the fusion area (T4 - L2). I will then sit down for a while and over the years, I have alwys found that a Victorian Style dining room chair was the most comfortable, good sized seat and a high vertical back, but now sitting down for any period is a P.I.A. so I am up/down like a yo-yo. At the moment, the most comfortable chair/seat I sit in is my car seat (Ford Focus for those in the UK:-).

2. My right shoulder I beleive is starting to stiffen up and shoulder movement is not as mobile as it was. This is the shoulder that has the suppressed shoulder blade as opposed to being normal. Now, having said that, I am right handed and also a regular ten pin bowler so the shoulder has seen plenty of exercise!!! but in recent months, I have been experiencing problems playing with the swing of the arm for ball delivery and release. I have even gone down in ball weight (i Play with 11 and 12lb balls) but this season I have not played.

Continuing on the right shoulder, I started to notice something quite simple that movement was getting restricted. I shall try and be as orally sensitive as possible here but once again, being right handed, I tend to wipe my backside after a dump using my right hand. In recent months, I have found that this is increasingly more differcult to do and am having trouble reaching behind and down to achieve the goal.

Also, I am having increasing periods of 'pins & needles' in my right hand. every morning I wake up with it.

No, I have not been to the doctors with any of this as my confidence in the UK NHS has gone from hero-2-zero over the years with personal experience in other matters as I feel I will be wasting my time and nothing will be done.

Regards,
Peter.

GillyG
13th July 2007, 01:00 PM
Well, Peter, first of all I think you're going to have to 'bite the bullet' and see your GP as you really need a referral to an orthopaedic consultant who specialises in spinal matters. Whereabouts in the UK are you? You will find a list of specialists from all over the UK (and indeed the world!) at the top of this forum. It's worth checking out the names on there as most of them come with personal recommendations from members of this site, so you should be in good hands.

Once referred they will take some up-to-date X-rays which will enable them to get a good idea of what is going on. In your case it does sound rather like wear and tear on the discs at the bottom of your lumbar spine which will have been taking the full brunt of things over the years. Since you had the old Harrington rod surgery, it could also be that you are developing 'flat back syndrome' if the instrumentation extends low into the lumbar area. With regards to the your shoulder issues, it may well be that you have developed a secondary curve above your original fusion which is now restricting the movement of your right side. There may also be some nerve involvement since you mention pins and needles in your right hand. Again, new X-rays will show whether any of these problems exist, so get to your GP!!!!
* Gilly puts on stern face and wags finger at Peter!*

If you have really lost all confidence in your GP, and can afford it, you could always go the private route for an initial consultation and X-rays. either way, you definitely need to see someone to get all this checked out.

Hope this helps a bit, please let us know how you go on.

Gilly xx

Oops, edit required as I forgot we're in the 'Juvenile etc' forum (what are you doing in here at your age!! :P ) the consultant list I mentioned is at the top of the General Discussions forum.

pistonpopper
13th July 2007, 01:48 PM
Originally posted by GillyG@Jul 13 2007, 11:00 AM

Oops, edit required as I forgot we're in the 'Juvenile etc' forum (what are you doing in here at your age!! :P ) the consultant list I mentioned is at the top of the General Discussions forum.

If there is a better forum for this thread, feel free to move it across to such a place. In some respects, this could be argued that this is the correct forum as it is dicussing the long term effects of 'Juvenile etc' ... Semantics..... However, if there is a better place for this, I am easy (so some have said :-) and we can continue there...

Peter acknowledges 'finger wagging' as well....

P.

GillyG
13th July 2007, 03:14 PM
I was only pulling your leg really, but I think most adults tend to post their questions in the General Discussions forum, regardless of age of onset, and most parents with younger kiddies in the other one. Also, more people tend to read the GD one, so your questions reach a wider audience. I'm not an admin or moderator so I wouldn't have a clue how to move it anyway!

There's also an adult thread on which we discuss the long term issues etc (and have a wee swear now and again!! :glee: :glee: ), but you have to have made a certain number of posts before this one is available to you, you know, 'old boy' (or gal!) privileges and all!

So....you're easy, eh? *Gilly makes a mental note!*

Anyway, get that appointment made pronto and please let us know how you go on.

Gilly xx

pistonpopper
16th July 2007, 12:15 AM
Originally posted by GillyG@Jul 13 2007, 01:14 PM
Anyway, get that appointment made pronto and please let us know how you go on.


I shall make that appointment but it wont be till the end of August at the earliest. I can't afford to take a day off work just to go to some damm quack who it seems only works 4 days a week and even then you can only phone up on day and get a 'possible' appointment that day, if not the day after so 2 days money lost !!!!

<MOAN ON>
I seem to remember I could (a) phone a quacks orifice and get an appointment for some time in future and (b) see a quack on a saturday morning, no UB40's allowed! - And we are told the NHS has moved on, Like fff.....

I remember when I went to the quacks just after my 40th birthday, they wrote to me and asked to see me so off i trot at the duly alloted time (i got paid for time off then!) and then saw the quack who said to me "haven't seen you for a while", I replied "I ain't been ill", to which they replied"you don't have to be ill to come here"... so what are they doing, running bloddy coffee mornings or sommat there?... Sod going there for sommat to do on a wet wednesday, its full of ill people and I ain't in no mood to catch something!
<MOAN OFF>

Anyway I will report back

P.

GillyG
16th July 2007, 12:32 AM
OK, if we're moaning about trying to get a Doctors appointment....

At my GP's, you have to phone from 8:15am onwards to try to get an appointment. Not possible as I'm travelling to work at that time! By the time I arrive at work it's constantly engaged and guess what? I'm supposed to be working, so I can't exactly sit and press redial all morning while the clinics back up!

So, I have to wait to be ill until Thursday or Friday (I only work 3 days a week), when I can spend a happy morning pressing redial. When I finally get through, they take my details and I then have to wait for the practice nurse to phone me back with a decision on whether or not I'm deemed worthy of an appointment!! :nut: :nut: :nut: Now if this happens to be on a Thursday...no chance, as they're only open in the morning, Fridays...hmmm, occasionally possible, if I'm close to death!

I tried to bypass the system by - shock horror - booking an appointment in advance, but couldn't get one for 3 weeks! :soapbox:

Rant over!

Gilly xx

Amazed Jean
16th July 2007, 12:37 AM
I giggled when I read your view of the "quacks" office. I would so hate to get into a doctor's office with a whole crowd of people. I had to change my GP a few years back and the first thingthe new guy said to me is that scoliosis isn't going to kill me but some stupid virus very well could since scoliosis is compromising my lung function. His solution is preventative medicine - first I have a flu shot every year and I had a pneumonia shot. Then his instructions which he reinforces everytime I see him: "Stay out of crowds - no schools, no churches, no daycare centers etc. If there are lots of people I am not allowed to go. Further he has told me that I should always ask for the first appointment of the day at any doctor or dental appointments so there are less "germs" about. So now I have a real reason to avoid some situations!!

pistonpopper
17th July 2007, 03:13 PM
GillyG, out of cuiosiry, would know what the pounds, shillings and pence would be on a private consulation (ball park) ?

I am seriously considering that route as it may be cheaper than having to take time off to see a quack and then see a consultant as I don't get paid for time off work - self employed - no work, no pay and I work 6-7 days a week.

AmazedJean seems to have got her self sorted out with a senisble chap. Adds weight to what I said. who the hell wants to sit in a surgery full of ill people. However, bent backs etc may not kill you but the bloddy strees it can cause will !!!

I have some good stories of my stay in Stanmore and my time after it, ie; falling in a swimming pool with my milwake brace on etc. One thing I have noticed is how quick it all seems today, the whole process of entry into Stanmore to the removal of the milwake brace was about 14 month.

Anyway, enough idle chatter - more work to be done.

P.

titch
17th July 2007, 03:28 PM
Unfortunately you do still need to see the GP in order to get the referral for the private appointment with the consultant. What I would suggest if you live close enough and are thinking to see someone at Stanmore again is to work out who you want to see, call his secretary to get a date pencilled in on the grounds you'll have your referral by then (so needs to be far enough ahead that you can get the referral sorted), then go to your GP and say right, I've got an appointment booked for X so I need the referral written and sent, thanks. That should hopefully invest the GP with a certain degree of urgency to ensure that it does get done, and they should have no reason to refuse or in any other way hold things up.

You will be looking at a fair whack of money though - especially if you'll need to have new xrays taken. The secretary should be able to advise you, but certainly back in 2001 a first appointment to see a consultant at RNOH was 150, and follow ups were 100. I don't know how much this will have gone up, but you can also expect to pay a reasonable sum for the xrays which you'll probably need 2 of (front and side). Depending on how much you earn and how urgently you want to see someone, it might just be worth the time off to go ask your GP for an NHS referral to Stanmore, and then follow the system through. If your GP says they cannot refer you on the NHS to Stanmore, for one thing you should be able to ask them to provide a list of where they can refer you (my GP cheerfully showed me the list when we were trying to decide whether it is yet worth referring me somewhere regarding my arthritis, and given that I'm "complicated" and he knows I'll do my research about where I want to go, he's quite happy to refer to a specialist centre) as there will be many places other than the local hospital, but for another thing supposedly from this summer onward for orthopaedic conditions you can choose where to be referred to for treatment.

Hope that helps a bit!

pistonpopper
17th July 2007, 03:36 PM
titch : thanks for your detailed reply. The costs are not that exhorbinate even if I add say 50% onto them. I like your idea of calling RNOH, Stanmore and then getting on the quacks case. Seems like a plan to me....

Stanmore is around a 2 - 2.5 hr drive for me, onto the M25 (worlds largest car park for non UK readers) from the south, round by Heathrow and then shoot off from there or down the M1 from the 25.


Thanks, P.

RugbyLaura
17th July 2007, 05:24 PM
Hi Peter, I'll try to be nice this time ;-)

We have taken Immy to see 3 different consultants privately and each time the cost has been different. 1st appointment for the most recent (June this year), and by far the best, was 180. Second appiontment is generally cheaper. X-rays have varied too but tend to be 100 - 130 per view. I suppose London might be more expensive than oop north though. Two of the consultants have been happy to transfer her onto the NHS and have assured us that the treatment will be exactly the same. Just maybe a little more waiting on the day of the appointment in not quite such nice surroundings.

Getting a referral is v frustrating! I had to book a GP appt 10 days in advance and was told to take Imogen in. She therefore missed an afternoon of school & the GP didn't even look at her! Appt took less than 5 mins and I was able to tell her exactly who we wanted to see. This may have been because we were going privately? Anyway, I would suggest that you contact your consultant of choice & see if they're prepared to transfer you to their NHS list after the initial consultation. This way you would be seen relatively quickly & save a bundle further down the road!

Love & grovels,

Laura :angel:

RugbyLaura
17th July 2007, 05:28 PM
I've just realised that I am recommending shameful abuse of the NHS system, jumping waiting lists, etc

Attempt at being angelic failed again.

Laura :glee:

pistonpopper
17th July 2007, 05:39 PM
I am all for any shameful abuse of any goverment department...

Wrong.. attempt at being angelic - PASSED.

We all have to look after our own interests first... If we don't, no other f... will. So do what you need to do, however you need to do it. If you tread on a few toes along the way, side step them and tell them (in the words of Tracy from BB8) - "deal wiv it". :-).

You will hear of no complaints from this quarter.

P.

GillyG
17th July 2007, 06:46 PM
Hey P, looks like the others have given you some brill advice, as always. I'd definitely decide who you want to be referred to and ask for them by name, it doesn't always do to give the GP's a choice! Having said that, I happen to have a very helpful and understanding GP and she couldn't have referred me to a better surgeon if she tried!

Hope you manage to get something sorted soon. Keep us posted.

Gilly xx

RugbyLaura
17th July 2007, 06:55 PM
Ahh but, we are truly fortunate! My already high opinion of Mr Cole grows day by day. Today I received a copy of his letter to Immy's GP regarding our consultation. He is the first to copy us in. For all we know he may be the fist to write to the GP.

GillyG
17th July 2007, 08:17 PM
Originally posted by RugbyLaura@Jul 17 2007, 04:55 PM
Ahh but, we are truly fortunate! My already high opinion of Mr Cole grows day by day. Today I received a copy of his letter to Immy's GP regarding our consultation. He is the first to copy us in. For all we know he may be the fist to write to the GP.
Well, he's written to my GP after each of my appointments and she always prints me out a copy as she knows I'm nosey! I didn't get sent anything from the man himself, but maybe you were seen as a private patient for Immy? That would make all the difference to such details I'm sure! Gotta love him though, eh? :spin:

Gilly xx

pistonpopper
18th July 2007, 10:25 AM
As per everyone's good advice, I have bitten the bullet and made an appointment to my local quack - next Tuesday (24th July'07). The plan is that if he faff's around in there as I expect him (yes it will be a him) to do, then I am gonna bend his shell like and tell him to refer me to Mr. Harrison at RNOH, Stanmore. By reading other threads and boards on this site, he comes highly recomended and respected.

Many years ago, I used to see a local orthopedics consultant call Devas at the RESH (Royal East Sussex Hosp, Hastings), btw; he invented the artificial hip I beleive, and he passed me up to RNOH @ Stanmore and Great Portland Street, London into the charge of C.W. Manning.. Sadly, this great man (Devas) has passed on. I loved his style, no faffing around etc, if you were late, he made wait till the end. Dunno about C.W. Manning, anyone here know anything as to his current status ?

Manning used to make me giggle on ward rounds at Stanmore (Colonel Wood Ward). Every Tuesday around 9:30 to 10:00 used to be the entorage arriving at all the beds. He would do the pleasantries with you, hello, how are you and then his registrar (a chap called Davies) would take over waffling at all the other members and a pile of students in tow. Some would prod and poke you etc, Manning would carry on talking to you eqnuiring about my model airplanes above my bed and what my next project would be, talking about formula one (yes, it did exist in 1970 - M. Andretti, Ronnie Peterson), football (always been a ManU fan) etc etc - I am sure he never listened to a word his Registrar said.

Will keep you posted.

P.

GillyG
18th July 2007, 11:45 AM
Sounds like you had an excellent consultant back then! I honestly think it's really important to have that rapport. I don't think I would have fared nearly so well under one of the plum-in-mouth, old-school types - no matter how good a surgeon they were - but then again, maybe that's just me. I thrive on a bit of banter and that's exactly what I get !! :glee: :glee:

Best of luck next Tuesday - stand your ground, tell him what you want and generally give him hell!! (They must hate patients like us!) And, most importantly, let us know what happens. :spin:

Gilly xx

pistonpopper
24th July 2007, 01:10 PM
Went to 'quacks' this morning. Pulled me about a minor bit, seemed more interested in prodding my stomach which has a hernia and decided to send me to local hospital for X-Rays of Back and Knees and see what gives from there. Now have to wait for appointment from local hospital as to when I go for X-Rays.

So, no further forward really other than a set of piccies will be taken as some point this year.

pistonpopper
31st August 2007, 08:36 PM
Originally posted by pistonpopper@Jul 24 2007, 11:10 AM
Went to 'quacks' this morning. Pulled me about a minor bit, seemed more interested in prodding my stomach which has a hernia and decided to send me to local hospital for X-Rays of Back and Knees and see what gives from there. Now have to wait for appointment from local hospital as to when I go for X-Rays.

So, no further forward really other than a set of piccies will be taken as some point this year.
OK, update from last, been a while :-). I got the first appointment for a 10AM slot on the 9th August 2007. Letter with appointment was posted through my door at midday on 9th thus I missed that one. Re-arranged appointment for today, 31st August 2007 where 2 Xrays were taken of my back, both laying down, one flat on back and one viewed from right side. I asked if there was any milage in them being taken vertical rather than horizontal but was told doctor had requested horizontal, was not offered any reasoning behind it. That got us off to bad start. Two were also taken on my right knee where I had already stated that both knees were giving me grief !!!!

I noticed that all the images taken were electronicly processed on the operators screen and seeing the last one taken of my right kneee, i asked if I could see the ones taken of my back. The radioligist said they would not be of any use to me coz I need to compare them to the ones taken previously at which point i said I have seen all my Xrays several times but the bastard still refused to let me see the piccies. I was then basically, told politely to piss off and call my doctor in 14 days time.

OK, lets see what happens in two to three weeks time.

P.

Amazed Jean
1st September 2007, 12:46 AM
I'd say someone needs to "piss off". I think it is your radiologist first and then your quack. You need to somehow see a scoliosis specialist. Somone here at SSo must know a way to help you get it done. Here, I would burn up the computer and telepphone until I got the name of someone who actually knew what he was talking about. I of course would end up paying through the nose, but then that's medicine in the USA. I hope someone on that side of the pond has a way for you to see someone compettent. I am available to a) bite knee caps, b) release the flying monkeys, c) whatever else I can do from here. In the meantime good luck and I am so sorry that the simplist medical request is over the heads of the quacks you have been seeing. ( I have never liked ducks or quacks for that matter.)