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sticktrix
24th December 2005, 03:17 PM
Hi to all!!! My name is Marco, and I suffer from kyphosis, but i don't let it get the best of me. :)

I'd like to surgically correct the postural defect, but I am not sure about the pros and cons of it all, I am a drummer and I love playing my instrument.

The reason why I am considering surgery is purely aesthetic, I don't suffer from any backaches and I still lead an active life.

The question is wheter the operation will have an impact over my daily life. Would I still be able to play my drums or for any matter be able to jog on a treadmill or be able to do any kind of physical exercise? Is it really worth the hassle of going through it?

Thanks for any opinion on the matter.

Happy holidays by the way!

MARCO

tonibunny
24th December 2005, 06:51 PM
Greetings Marco, and welcome to SSO! :welcome2:

I have scoliosis myself so can't really advise you, but there are quite a few people here who have Kyphosis, including people who have had surgery for it very recently. Stick around and I am sure you'll hear from them very soon :D

Yay for drummers! There are also a lot of musical people here :joke:

Toni xxx

Jonny
24th December 2005, 09:28 PM
Welcome to SSO Marco :wave: glad you found us!

First of all, us fused people have absolutely no trouble doing most things after the initial recovery period - you'd be back on a treadmill/drum kit/bungee cord in no time. Surgery is successful and safer than people think.

The thing is, are you certain your kyphosis is purely postural? Can you fully straighten up with effort? If that's the case, it may be hard (and unwise) to find a surgeon to fuse it. They would be unwilling to operate on a curve that can be corrected by other means - I'd suggest you try Alexander Technique before surgery even crosses your mind, because on a postural curve it works wonders.

If it is partially structural, though, you'd find it easier to find a surgeon who will do it. Even so, the curve would have to be of a certain magnitude before they'll consider surgery above recommending non-invasive treatment.

Have no fear, though - the drums will continue :D my violin did and many of us are musicians, as Toni said.

Phil
27th December 2005, 05:48 PM
Hello and welcome. I cannot add much other than if you experience no pain and your curve is in fact posterial surgery may not be the best option. Its pretty big stuff for just cosmetic reasons. See a specialist though to get exact measurments etc and to find out if there's a cause. That will help greatly. Good luck in what ever route you take.

sticktrix
29th December 2005, 04:15 AM
Well, as far as I know, the last measurement I had was when I was 13. If i'm not mistaken, the curve was a bit over 55 degrees. It obviously has worsened since, I believe. At the time I was wearing a corrective brace, but it broke when I was in holiday and I couldn't wear it further. Therefore I had decided to leave it as it was torture anyway. I was wearing it 23 hours daily, and I just couldn't take the fact that I was barely able to move.

Can anybody give me more details about the Alexander technique mentioned above? Is it some sort of physiotherapy or just a series of exercises like the Pilates?

Thanks again guys!

MARCO

mark
29th December 2005, 01:34 PM
Hello Marco

Welcome to the site sorry i have'nt welcomed you sooner but its been manic with xmas and all

Hope you enjoy the site.

sticktrix
29th December 2005, 04:19 PM
No prob! Cheers mate!

nutmeg
31st December 2005, 04:20 AM
There was a thread about Alexander technique a few months back. I couldn't manage to link directly to it, but you can use the Search function at the top of the page to find it

mark
1st January 2006, 02:20 AM
Peace be with you all

Thaleias spirit
1st January 2006, 11:55 AM
Marco,

These are links to previous discussions we had on the Alexander technique:

http://www.scoliosis-support.org/modules/i...&showtopic=1918 (http://www.scoliosis-support.org/modules/ipboard/index.php?s=&showtopic=1918)


http://www.scoliosis-support.org/modules/i...=&showtopic=657 (http://www.scoliosis-support.org/modules/ipboard/index.php?s=&showtopic=657)


Hope it's of some help to you.

chele

sticktrix
10th January 2006, 04:54 PM
Thanks mate... I'll check them right away!

Little Ali
10th January 2006, 09:18 PM
Hi Marco!
I have Kyphosis too. I don't really have any advice unfortunately. I just wanted to say hello :wave:

zerodegrees
10th January 2006, 11:39 PM
Hi Marco & welcome,

I'm 12 weeks post op for an 80 degrees kyphosis correction,now 38 degrees. Cosmetic reasons was a factor in my opting for surgery but so was the pain. My curve was what they call "stiff" and was a strong candidate for surgery. Surgeons are very strict on the criteria that they use when selecting candidates for surgery & it is a big step to take. In my case it was totally worth it & I am delighted with the result. However, it was and still is a hard slog.

Anyway, welcome & if you need anything,we're here for you.

cheers

john

mark
11th January 2006, 09:48 AM
Hi John

Can you just let us know what your surgeon meant by "My curve was what they call "stiff". I haven't heard that term before.

Thanks Mate

Mark

zerodegrees
11th January 2006, 11:37 AM
Mark,

Think the other term is rigid. Someone else might correct me but my understanding of it is a curve that cant be fixed by improving posture alone. They test the rigidity of the curve by having you lie down face down and pulling you back by the shoulders. In my case pulling my shoulders back didn't alter the curve (ie it moved with me) & thus was determined to be stiff. I think it occurs in kyphosis when the vertebrae get wedged.

This is why (I believe) they do the anterior release part of surgery first. This loosens the spine and makes the curve flexible so that they can straighten it out!

As usual for someone who has had surgery I still aint got too much of a clue about how it all fits together!!

Happy new year to you!

john

mark
11th January 2006, 11:54 AM
Thanks John thats very interesting its a test the quacks i have seen have never done, so when i go back i will definately be asking why.

And a happy New Year to you and Des too, may it be a free of pain and stress.

Marcilo
11th January 2006, 10:48 PM
This is why (I believe) they do the anterior release part of surgery first. This loosens the spine and makes the curve flexible so that they can straighten it out!

I assume release refers to removal of discs.?

Jonny
12th January 2006, 12:11 AM
That's right - they remove discs and, depending on what they want to do with the shape of your spine, pack the disc space for bone graft ready for the posterior rods to hold it all in place.

When they want to increase lordosis or reduce kyphosis, they pack more graft in to open up the front of the spine and bend it forwards. When they want to decrease lordosis or increase kyphosis, they fill the disc spaces with little or nothing, and it closes up the front of the spine.

sticktrix
7th March 2006, 05:25 AM
Interesting stuff. I should have actually asked for some extra info through my ex girlfriend (she was a physio), but you guys seem all well informed.
Sorry also for not updating, I still feel uncomfy talking about my back problems... but the fact that someone understands how I feel is rather conforting.

Marcilo
7th March 2006, 07:53 PM
That's right - they remove discs and, depending on what they want to do with the shape of your spine, pack the disc space for bone graft ready for the posterior rods to hold it all in place.

If that is the case, why do they have gap between two surgeries? I am sure there are reasons for that but since they remove discs and pad that area with bone graft then why not complete the procedure by having rods too in one go.?

Jonny
8th March 2006, 02:14 AM
Often they do - they can put a rod on the anterior spine by the disc spaces, which completes an anterior fusion. That can be it, or they can then go on to fuse the posterior spine with rods and graft too.

If they do want to open you up anteriorly and posteriorly, sometimes they do do them both at once. I think about half of anterior/posterior surgeries are staged and half are on the same surgical day. If they stop between them, it's to avoid keeping you under anaesthetic for too long, giving you a chance to recover from any blood loss, and to assess your correction and see if they need to fuse less or more when they do the posterior stage. Sometimes the second stage is never performed because the correction was so satisfactory from the anterior stage.

Simon
2nd January 2008, 01:11 AM
Hi guys
i have a 92% kyphosis and mine not rigid i can straighten my back up but i can not hold it up for to long as it very uncomfutable its just goes back again.
am having my operation in feb/march time.
am a bit worried now that they might say no but they have examined me and a pre op is booked for wensday of next week.....cosmetically its very upsetting and i get pain from it but not the amount that other people get....

tonibunny
2nd January 2008, 01:15 AM
Hi Simon,

If you're able to straighten your back then that's really good news - it means that the surgeon will be able to do so too! It's a lot easier to correct a flexible spine than a stiff one :-)

Toni xx

Seeking_help
2nd January 2008, 01:19 AM
Originally posted by sibowainwright@Jan 2 2008, 12:11 AM
Hi guys
i have a 92% kyphosis and mine not rigid i can straighten my back up but i can not hold it up for to long as it very uncomfutable its just goes back again.
am having my operation in feb/march time.
am a bit worried now that they might say no but they have examined me and a pre op is booked for wensday of next week.....cosmetically its very upsetting and i get pain from it but not the amount that other people get....
Hey - I'm in the same boat as you. I have a 90degree curve and there is a high possibility I can have surgery this year (knock on wood); however, I'm waiting for the MRI and CT Scan results first. I too have back pain, but not to the degree of some others here.

I've wanted surgery for so long, but now that it may becoming a reality I am having doubts. I can't recommend on what you should do but I do recommend that you think long and hard and weight the risks and benefits before making a decision. If you don't feel comfortable now - try postponing for 6 months, a Year...etc.

Also think about perhaps getting into shape prior to surgery (if you do choice this path) as it will help any recovery period.

Simon
2nd January 2008, 01:22 PM
hi seeking-help and toni bunny
i have been waiting for surgery for so long i just want it over and done with i have been turned down a few times and been fobbed of until my back is now upto 92% curve a year ago it was 72% so its got a lot worse over a year or 2
i have thought about the day of my surgery for so long.....
thanks for all the info xx