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sally333
4th December 2005, 06:55 PM
:cry: I had surgery on Nov,22nd. I had a 110 degree kyphosis that was corrected to 45 or 50,not sure will have to ask at my next appoitment. Six weeks ago my curve was 107 so it was very progressive and needed to be taken care of. I had no idea at how progressive it actually was untill the surgery was over. I was fused from t2 to l4. two very long rods,three cross links and about 37 screws. The surgery was first threw my chest side,and then down my whole back. The surgery took about ten plus hrs. My first few days after surgery I spent in the nicu-very painfull for me as they had me on the wrong doses of medication. It was not untill six days later when the pain management team discovered that I had been on a higher dose before surgery then I was put on after. No wonder it wasnt working. I wasn't allowed to sit up or stand up for six days after surgery but the pain I was in I dont think I could have anyway. The first time I was alble to get up was very scarry and very painfull. I can not lie to anyone the pain will be there and it is more then I ever would have expected. Getting in and out of bed was the worst. Having to strain that side the surgery was on was very painfull. It was a challenge to get in and out of bed and still is. I am at home and I only sleep in my reclining chair,I just cant get into bed or on the couch yet.
I had surgery the 22nd of nov and was able to come home on Dec first. The Doctors wanted me to stay in the hospital and go threw a rehab program. I being stubborn chose not to, but at times I wonder if that was a mistake. I am making it on my own but it is very difficult. I live by my self so there is no help. I could manage geting in the bed and on the couch if there were someone here to help me. Some one to cook for me or just be there when I really need something. But because I am alone I have been forced to do more then some for my self,and therefor I am going to recover a little quicker. The dr is very surprised by all that I do. The Dr was at first reluctant to let me go home alone as he was afraid I would do to much. Like snow blow--even if I wanted to do that I just couldnt. That I found very funny. So he did let me go but reluctently.
I am starting to ramble and I need some pain-meds now so I have to go. It is so nice this was the first time since surgery I have been able to sit up and be on the computer.
Any questions please ask. I will be home for a few months so I will check back frequently.
And yes things do get better every day.

Thaleias spirit
4th December 2005, 07:11 PM
First off .. Welcome Back !!!
and :squeeze:, you deserve a few of these for making it through it all okay.

I can't believe they had you on the wrong medication dosage!! I can just imagine how awful you must have felt during it all! Thank God that's all sorted now for you though.

Also good to hear you are doing so well at home,
just make sure to take things as easy as possible and not overdo it.

Looking forward to hearing more about how it all went, I just wont ask you too much for now. You need to build up some more strength!

And as before we are still here for you, for any questions you may have now. The surgery may be over with but this recovery is the most important bit and I'm sure you will have some questions as you make your way through it.

Take care Sally

:squeeze:


chele

sins
4th December 2005, 08:07 PM
Hi Sally,
Firstly, Welcome back and I'm delighted that your curve has been safely reduced to such a degree.That's a huge success by any standard.You're very brave to cope at home on your own.
Are you pleased with how your back now looks? or has it sunk in yet?
Hopefully your friends will call and help with the house and food preparation.It's great news to see you back on line, we were wondering how it all went for you.So once again congratulations and well done.Looking forward to hearing all the details when you can manage more time at the computer.
Sins

mark
4th December 2005, 08:10 PM
Hi Sally welcome home. Wow what a story you have been through it a bit, sorry to hear about the pain i hope the drugs start working soon. As Chele says take it easy and build your strength up.

Glad to hear you had a great correction les hope this is the last of your pain

take care

mark

jfkimberly
5th December 2005, 12:09 AM
Is there a nurse or someone coming by to check on you periodically? I can't imagine being allowed to go home alone after such a serious operation. How are you doing it? Impressive, but a little scary, too.

But wow! 110 to 50 degrees? That's an amazing correction. I can't wait 'til you've recovered enough from the op to start to feel good about how much better you look and feel. Congratulations!

Abbi
5th December 2005, 12:55 AM
Welcome back Sally! :welcome: Thanks for returning to us to share what you have been through! Seems like you have been through the wars, but like you say, it gets better everyday! I am so thrilled that you got an amzing correction!

Hope ur feeling like your normal self again soon! :D

Marti
5th December 2005, 04:00 AM
Welcome back Sally!

titch
5th December 2005, 09:38 AM
Welcome back!! That's such a fantastic correction, you must be thrilled :D

I'm really impressed that you're managing on your own. I'm not at all sure that I could have done after the revision. :squeeze: So glad to hear it went well though :-) (Although I'll add to the disbelief over the lack of painkillers :-o it's ridiculous that they didn't take into consideration what you were on before, it makes a huge difference to post-op requirements)

Jmullings
5th December 2005, 11:11 AM
Hi Sally

What a great correction. You must be really pleased. I know it seems that you are in so much pain that you don't know what to do with yourself but trust me things do improve on a daily basis. You will notice things that you can do that you couldn't do the day before.

Hope the recovery continues as quickly as it has been

Jo

zerodegrees
5th December 2005, 12:00 PM
Hi Sally,

Great to have you back with us again. I know how hard it is with pain at the beginning and sometimes its even hard to get excited about the incredible correction thats been achieved but believe me it will get better. I am now 7 weeks post op and cannot beleive how much better I feel. I'm still in pain & still swallowing painkillers like sweets but I feel so much more positive. That will come for you.

Just like Jo said you will notice you can do different things each day. This week I actually managed to lie on my side in bed which believe me I never ever thought I would.

Anyway, we're all here for you whenever you need us.

love john x

Blair
5th December 2005, 02:37 PM
Hi Sally! It's nice to have you back. I'm sorry you're still feeling so bad, but you'll feel better soon, I'm sure! It sounds like your correction was just fantastic. If living on your own gets to be too much, maybe you could ring your surgeon and see about maybe going into that rehab program?

Marcilo
5th December 2005, 03:50 PM
Wow, managing on your own, hats off to you. We all wish you a quick recovery

I have a question here, 110 to 50 degrees, is that a normal correction? I was under the impression that after OP curves go down drastically. Does this matter on different other factors.?

This week I actually managed to lie on my side in bed which believe me I never ever thought I would.

This was pre OP or Post OP.

Sorry guys I have too many questions bundled here

titch
5th December 2005, 04:05 PM
Sally's main correction was for kyphosis, not scoliosis. The type and extent of surgery is pretty much the same as it is for scoliosis, but the corrections will sound a lot different - there tends to be less correction on a kyphosis for various reasons, but 60+ degrees of correction is fantastic whether the curve is scoliosis or kyphosis.

Also, the normal spine has no scoliosis curve at all, but has a kyphosis between roughly 20 and 45 degrees. So to get it down to 50 degrees is pretty similar to taking a 70 degree scoliosis down to 10 degrees :-)

John was talking about lying on his side post op - it tends to be a bit of a challenge initially, because it's difficult to get lying like that in the first place, and if you've had anterior surgery is often especially uncomfortable to lie on that side until all the swelling has gone down.

Hope those answers help!

Thaleias spirit
5th December 2005, 08:38 PM
Originally posted by titch@Dec 5 2005, 04:05 PM
John was talking about lying on his side post op - it tends to be a bit of a challenge initially, because it's difficult to get lying like that in the first place, and if you've had anterior surgery is often especially uncomfortable to lie on that side until all the swelling has gone down.


I'm a bit confused so hopefully someone can explain and make this a bit clearer for me. While anterior surgery is considered to be the front of the spine, it's mostly carried out by going in through the persons side, yes? I can understand that being quite uncomfortable to lie on.

But for most cases, posterior surgery is carried out so would it not also be extremely difficult to lie on your back afterwards? Especially if they have achieved a considerable correction? I mean thw whole symmetry of how your spine is and how you lie is now very different from before so wouldn't there be extra pressure?

sally333
6th December 2005, 05:02 AM
Originally posted by sins@Dec 4 2005, 08:07 PM
Hi Sally,
Firstly, Welcome back and I'm delighted that your curve has been safely reduced to such a degree.That's a huge success by any standard.You're very brave to cope at home on your own.
Are you pleased with how your back now looks? or has it sunk in yet?
Hopefully your friends will call and help with the house and food preparation.It's great news to see you back on line, we were wondering how it all went for you.So once again congratulations and well done.Looking forward to hearing all the details when you can manage more time at the computer.
Sins
I'm not sure if i'm brave or stubborn for coming home. I figured that I would be in the same amount of pain in the hospital as I would be at home and that is why I choose to come home. I'm not really sure how my back looks yet. It is still swollen and actually I haven't got a mirror long enough to be able to see it. I know that it is straighter as I am a few inches taller then some people who I had been shorter then before surgery.That alone is kinda scarry. Shows how much pulling of the spine they actually did.To tell you the truth the whole extent of the surgery hasn't sunck in yet at all.
My friends and family have put alot of tv dinners in my freazer so all I have to do is heat things up. That has helped me a great deal. They also have come and did a few things around the house that I am unable to do at this time,such as vacuuming and washing my cloths.I can't thank them enough. If it weren't for them I really don't think that I could have come home already.

sally333
6th December 2005, 05:15 AM
Originally posted by jfkimberly@Dec 5 2005, 12:09 AM
Is there a nurse or someone coming by to check on you periodically? I can't imagine being allowed to go home alone after such a serious operation. How are you doing it? Impressive, but a little scary, too.

But wow! 110 to 50 degrees? That's an amazing correction. I can't wait 'til you've recovered enough from the op to start to feel good about how much better you look and feel. Congratulations!
I have no nurse checking on me although I am sure if I need one I could have a home health aid once in awhile. I did have a check up today and they said my back incisions look great. The dissolvable sutures however are poking there way out and causing a bit of pain so they clipped them a little.I guess sometimes they just wont dissolve. That is what is all down the length of the back and then steri strips over top. The chest incision had a whole bunch of staples and they also have dissolvable sutures. The staples were removed a few days ago and the staples are very painfull when there still in as everytime I would move I was pulling them out. I was very happy when they were taken out.
I might be home alone but it seems as if my co-workers and family are keeping a very close eye on me. So that is great,puts my mind a ease. If it wasn't for the pain I would be very happy so I hope it goes away soon. The Dr said today that it will be there for more then a few months though.

sally333
6th December 2005, 05:23 AM
Originally posted by zerodegrees@Dec 5 2005, 12:00 PM
Hi Sally,

Great to have you back with us again. I know how hard it is with pain at the beginning and sometimes its even hard to get excited about the incredible correction thats been achieved but believe me it will get better. I am now 7 weeks post op and cannot beleive how much better I feel. I'm still in pain & still swallowing painkillers like sweets but I feel so much more positive. That will come for you.

Just like Jo said you will notice you can do different things each day. This week I actually managed to lie on my side in bed which believe me I never ever thought I would.

Anyway, we're all here for you whenever you need us.

love john x
What I really need to ask is-How long before you felt any comfort pain wise since you have had your surgery?
Do you lay down on the couch or in a bed? Or did you have to sleep in a chair as I am doing?
Of course in the hospital I was in a bed but every time I had to lay down or get up it caused extream pain. That is why I do not do it know.
What kind of pain meds are you on?
I take 60mgs of oxycodone twice a day and then I take endocet every four hrs as needed.
Seeing as I was one 100mgs of kadian(slowly released morpheen sulfate) a day before surgery it has been harder to get my pain under controll as I was already used to the morpheen.
So if you did sleep in bed when you got home how did you get in and out. Did you have help to do that or just suck up the pain and do it yourself?
I need to find a way to get comfortable.

sally333
6th December 2005, 05:31 AM
Originally posted by Thaleias spirit+Dec 5 2005, 08:38 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Thaleias spirit @ Dec 5 2005, 08:38 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-titch@Dec 5 2005, 04:05 PM
John was talking about lying on his side post op - it tends to be a bit of a challenge initially, because it's difficult to get lying like that in the first place, and if you've had anterior surgery is often especially uncomfortable to lie on that side until all the swelling has gone down.


I'm a bit confused so hopefully someone can explain and make this a bit clearer for me. While anterior surgery is considered to be the front of the spine, it's mostly carried out by going in through the persons side, yes? I can understand that being quite uncomfortable to lie on.

But for most cases, posterior surgery is carried out so would it not also be extremely difficult to lie on your back afterwards? Especially if they have achieved a considerable correction? I mean thw whole symmetry of how your spine is and how you lie is now very different from before so wouldn't there be extra pressure? [/b][/quote]
I guess that my back part is not as painfull as the side is. You have to figure that going in threw the side is cuting threw the musell and spreading the ribs apart and that alone causes so much damage. They pop a lung and have to move everything out of the way so that is going to be sore for along time.

zerodegrees
6th December 2005, 10:18 AM
2 things: Firstly Chele - for some inexplicable reason lying on my back was amazingly confortable! The only sore bit was when I was lying on the chest drain. They also get you to lie at 30 degrees which is basically a pillow wedged under your back, a pillow under your legs and one between my legs. This helps take pressure off your wounds & lets you sleep "tilted". I had to rotate between my back and either side at 30 degrees for 6 weeks until last week when I finally gave up on the pillows! I'm not sure if part of the reason it was comfortable was because I lost most of the sensation in my back after surgery (this returns so dont panic!).

Sally,

Regarding the pain. I am still on morphine tablets but these are being reduced day by day and are marvellous. I am still on diclofenac (anti inflammatory with a painkiller), paracetamol (like tylenol), antibiotics & a few for constipation which is a side effect of the morphine.

As for getting comfortable. When I was in hospital sitting up was excrutiating & unbearable. I felt sick, light headed and very sore. When I got home I spent a lot of time in bed. My partner was always around but I was able to get in and out of bed ok. I used a technique called a log roll to get in and out. Did your nurses show you how to get in and out of bed? And still do. This basically keeps the spine straight. Be under no illusions though. Like you, getting in and out of bed at first was unbearably sore but once I was in I was ok. I used to sleep at a 30 degree angle as explained above which was very comfortable.

Everyone said to me (& its true) that you turn a real corner after 6 weeks. I turned a few before then but I felt a lot better after 6 weeks.

All of us who have had surgery know what you are going through. It takes a lot of courage and strength. I used to listen to people like abbi who were 6 weeks ahead and becky (many more weeks ahead). They used to tell me how much better they felt and that gave me hope.

So, I promise it will get better but if you need any more advice you know where we all are.

love john x

thesatindoll
6th December 2005, 02:01 PM
I had my surgery on the same day (came home last night).

The pain was hell, frankly, but it got better, it was always relieving to lie on the side where my chest drain wasn't (I hated that thing) but once it was out, I liked to lie on both sides, and unsupported, even though it hurt me! Sitting up wasn't to painful for me, but getting up to sit was, as was gettig up to stand.
I'm lying in bed, and in a firm bed, flat on my back if I get painful during the day, chairs and couches don't help me at all.

But it's all good, and I'm recovering well, and so are you by the sounds of it!

Thaleias spirit
6th December 2005, 08:43 PM
Originally posted by sally333@Dec 6 2005, 05:31 AM
I guess that my back part is not as painfull as the side is. You have to figure that going in threw the side is cuting threw the musell and spreading the ribs apart and that alone causes so much damage. They pop a lung and have to move everything out of the way so that is going to be sore for along time.
I didn't think about that. However, upon reading that I also remembered when I did side bending xrays last year. They were painful but the real pain hit when they asked me to lie on the table to do a side cray, the pain was awful to the point I was fighting back tears!

Is it possible to sleep on your stomach / front at any stage of this?
Or is it just too awkward or not advised at all?

RocketQueen
6th December 2005, 11:05 PM
Originally posted by sally333+Dec 6 2005, 05:31 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (sally333 @ Dec 6 2005, 05:31 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> Originally posted by Thaleias spirit@Dec 5 2005, 08:38 PM
<!--QuoteBegin-titch@Dec 5 2005, 04:05 PM
John was talking about lying on his side post op - it tends to be a bit of a challenge initially, because it's difficult to get lying like that in the first place, and if you've had anterior surgery is often especially uncomfortable to lie on that side until all the swelling has gone down.


I'm a bit confused so hopefully someone can explain and make this a bit clearer for me. While anterior surgery is considered to be the front of the spine, it's mostly carried out by going in through the persons side, yes? I can understand that being quite uncomfortable to lie on.

But for most cases, posterior surgery is carried out so would it not also be extremely difficult to lie on your back afterwards? Especially if they have achieved a considerable correction? I mean thw whole symmetry of how your spine is and how you lie is now very different from before so wouldn't there be extra pressure?
I guess that my back part is not as painfull as the side is. You have to figure that going in threw the side is cuting threw the musell and spreading the ribs apart and that alone causes so much damage. They pop a lung and have to move everything out of the way so that is going to be sore for along time. [/b][/quote]
I worry about this deflating a lung bussiness, I feel it could be quite dangerous/problematic?? x

Jonny
7th December 2005, 12:01 AM
It's really quite safe - little can go wrong and there's always a chest specialist on hand anyway. The worst thing that can happen is that it doesn't fully expand against the chest afterwards, and it's necessary to keep the drain in longer or put one back in. Even if that does happen, the worst experience would be it feeling odd and being out of breath.

do not read if you are of a squeamish nature

In my experience, posterior surgery is considerably more painful than anterior surgery. With anterior surgery, one single incision is made through the skin, intercostal muscle and periosteum, the rib is removed (not as painful as a broken rib) and the rib spreaders go in and hold the ribs apart either side, with most of the intercostal muscle intact. The retraction doesn't cause aching particularly afterwards.

Beyond the chest wall there is just a huge airspace, directly beyond which is your spine - easy access, very little more painful invasion to reach it.

There are a number of nerve endings on your side there (and diaphragm if it is an anterior lumbar approach) so there is pain on the surface of your chest, but there is very little in the way of nerve endings in the anterior spine and the tissue round it, and in my experience, after anterior surgery, your spine DOESN'T HURT, only your side.

Posterior surgery, however, involves a much longer incision in skin just as sensitive, and then through at least 1/2" of fasciae, which then needs to be peeled from the spine to visualise it and held retracted about 2" each side. (It does all knit back and stick together again in weeks!) The posterior spine is slightly more sensitive than the anterior spine I think, so the decortication for fusion and instrumenting can make it sore too.

This is not all felt though, as often an intercostal block is performed with anterior surgery to numb the site afterwards, and after a posterior surgery, the skin on your back and fasciae are numb from the incision.

Remember though, with any surgery like this, when you wake up you will have an entirely new and more healthy body shape, you will have one large new source of pain, and one HUGE source of pain relief. Any previous discomfort about particular positions will have gone because your body has...well, been rebooted. You'll have nice drugs, which ensure you get to sleep with no trouble (you'll be asleep for much of the first two or three days), your surgery will have dealt with certain pre-op discomforts instantly, any remaining old pain will have been wiped out by the post-op pain relief, and if you're affected by pain at all, it'll be surgical pain.

I ought to mention that there's nothing at all here that is of any considerable risk, and while it all makes you a bit sore, nothing that is lastingly painful.

Abbi
7th December 2005, 12:21 AM
Originally posted by Jonny@Dec 7 2005, 12:01 AM
and the rib spreaders go in and hold the ribs apart either side,


and in my experience, after anterior surgery, your spine DOESN'T HURT, only your side.


ewww.....rib spreaders....sounds, er...lovely :vomit:

I agree with you that ur spine doesnt hurt after anterior surgery, however, I guess you had it in two stages, so you could tell the pain, I couldn't....I had pain all over (but it was controlled ok)
I found after I got home however, my posterior wound did not hurt, and I didn't have much pain in that area - just shoulder pain, and lower back pain! The one that hurt the most was the anterior....just the area around the wound though

Jonny
7th December 2005, 12:43 AM
Shoulder pain - was it when you breathed, by any chance?

Mr Tucker warned me before the anterior surgery that I was likely to get shoulder pain afterwards. The shoulder shares phrenic nerves with the diaphragm, so if they have to go through a little of your diaphragm to get to your lumbar spine, your shoulder tends to hurt afterwards. Most of my shoulder pain went after a couple of months but 18 months on I still get occasional twinges in my left shoulder.

RocketQueen
7th December 2005, 02:33 AM
Thanks Jonny, that was a great descriptoin u gave :). You also made me feel better about the lung thing.

Thanks again x

Abbi I agree, rib spreaders! Noooooooo!!! lol

x

Abbi
7th December 2005, 01:09 PM
Originally posted by Jonny@Dec 7 2005, 12:43 AM
Shoulder pain - was it when you breathed, by any chance?

Nope - I had constant shoulder pain after surgery! Its mostly gone now, although I do get it from time to time!

The parts around my anterior site are still a bit tender at the moment, and I tend to get twitches a lot - like a little sharp shock, or in the words of titch "a nerve bit me" :D

RocketQueen
7th December 2005, 01:32 PM
Oh thats a good one. A nerve bit me. LOl, i like it x

thesatindoll
7th December 2005, 04:21 PM
Can I lie on my front? The doctors never said anything, but I've been hearing different things so....

jfkimberly
7th December 2005, 04:26 PM
I don't know the answer to your question, Leia, but now I'm wondering why you wouldn't be allowed to lay on your front if it's comfortable for you. What have you heard?

Abbi
7th December 2005, 04:31 PM
The information which Becky (marmyte) gave me from Stanmore said "do not lie on your stomach"

but I kinna broke that rule a few weeks later.....It was comfortable lying on my tummy.....

I think there something happens the shape of your spine when you lie on your front, not sure (someone told me something about it at one stage)

What restrictions have u been given Leia?

Jonny
7th December 2005, 05:32 PM
Your spine shouldn't change shape at all if you've been fused, whether you're on your front or on your head...

My SHO gave me this reason for that restriction: with older instrumentation, particularly Harrington rods, it was thought that lying on your front could dislodge the hardware. Thus it didn't apply to me and nor does it apply to anyone at all having modern spine surgery.

Come to think of it, if all there is is one long (Harrington) rod with inward-facing compression hooks at each end, and you do something to compress your posterior spine (like try and arch your back), it could slip the hooks out of place. With outward-facing distraction hooks the same would be possible if you extended the posterior spine by bending too much.

None of it really is possible, AFAIK, with modern instrumentation.

Abbi
7th December 2005, 05:35 PM
Originally posted by Jonny@Dec 7 2005, 05:32 PM
Your spine shouldn't change shape at all if you've been fused, whether you're on your front or on your head...


oops - shows u how much I know then...... :oops:

RocketQueen
8th December 2005, 02:45 PM
Jonny in starting to think you could perform all our scoli ops urself. LOL x

Abbi
8th December 2005, 05:16 PM
he could! :P he gave us all a very good account of scoli surgery last night on msn......!!!!

zerodegrees
9th December 2005, 01:32 PM
I was told on discharge from hospital that I could lie on my front if I wanted! Still haven't done it though in case I get stuck forever & have to spend Christmas face down in bed !!!!

Jmullings
9th December 2005, 02:22 PM
I was told I could lie on my front or on either side if I found it comfortable. Although I didn't like lying on my side because I could feel my ribs moving about from the costoplasty when I breathed in and out.

sally333
10th December 2005, 07:13 AM
Soon I will be writing about my stay in the hospital. I need to get up the nerve to think about it again. I am so angry with the care that I had while there. There where however a few great people that took care of me. A few times I just wanted to pack my bags and leave they made me so angry. Then it would hit me that I was unable to pack my bags and go on my way as it would have been impossible in the condition that I was in. So I look foward to writing this in the next few days.
Talk to you all later.

jfkimberly
10th December 2005, 09:31 AM
Ugh, hospital stays can be dreadful even without an unresponsive (or rude?) staff. I am interested in hearing your experience, but if it's still distressing you to think about it, take some time to get further along in your recovery. We'll all wait for you. *smile*

sweetkisses2351
13th December 2005, 04:27 AM
i feel for you sally.. although my surgery wasn't as extreme.. i was stubborn and somehow made it out after 4 days!! but i can't tell you how painful it was.. it was honestly the WORST pain i have ever felt in my life and even after the 6 weeks period i was still very fragile.. they had to put me on something 10x stronger than morphene when i was in the hosp =O but you are right.. one day at a time and you will be back to normal soon enough.. i wish you the best of luck with your recovery!!!

<3 Annie

RocketQueen
13th December 2005, 07:40 PM
Originally posted by zerodegrees@Dec 9 2005, 01:32 PM
I was told on discharge from hospital that I could lie on my front if I wanted! Still haven't done it though in case I get stuck forever & have to spend Christmas face down in bed !!!!
Nuts!

sally333
27th December 2005, 05:12 AM
Well I am back from another stay at the hospital. It was so scarry. I had to call a ambulance at about two am ont the 21rst. I heard and felt some poping in my right side at the surgery sight. The rib area was so painfull and infact my wole side was. I couldn't move my arm nor could I get a deep breath in because of the pain. The pain was the same or even worse then when I woke up from surgery. What happened was is that somehow I managed to pull the stiches out that were inside holding things together. So things ended up tareing in there. They also found some fluid around my lung area. I was treated for the pain and finally had enuff and went home on Sunday the 25th. Now I am really scared something is going to happen again.

RocketQueen
27th December 2005, 08:06 AM
Oh my GOD! What an ordeal. Don't worry, worrying is the worst thing u can do. It prolly will not happen again, just take it real easy for a while, and do as the doctors tell you. I'm sure it'll all be sorted out in good time. x

Abbi
28th December 2005, 12:24 AM
Oh goodness, that is terrible Sally!! :squeeze: I hope you feel better soon, and get back on the road to recovery!

Lizzie89
28th December 2005, 09:14 PM
Oh my thats awful :squeeze: you seem to be having such a time of it :-( Hope you get better soon :bestwishes:
x

sins
29th December 2005, 08:18 AM
Hi Sally,
Sorry you had to endure all this after coming so far after surgery.The chances of something else going wrong is slim.How are your pain levels now? Hopefully it'll have settled down and you'll feel a lot better by the new year.The human body is amazing and will recover in time from all this trauma.I guess it's difficult to be patient and wait for this to happen.Just take it easy and you'll get there in the end.I'm also glad they picked up on the fluid on the lung, it can be very uncomfortable, I'm told.
Sins

sally333
11th January 2006, 09:16 PM
Originally posted by Jonny@Dec 7 2005, 05:32 PM
Your spine shouldn't change shape at all if you've been fused, whether you're on your front or on your head...

My SHO gave me this reason for that restriction: with older instrumentation, particularly Harrington rods, it was thought that lying on your front could dislodge the hardware. Thus it didn't apply to me and nor does it apply to anyone at all having modern spine surgery.

Come to think of it, if all there is is one long (Harrington) rod with inward-facing compression hooks at each end, and you do something to compress your posterior spine (like try and arch your back), it could slip the hooks out of place. With outward-facing distraction hooks the same would be possible if you extended the posterior spine by bending too much.

None of it really is possible, AFAIK, with modern instrumentation.
Well at first I didn't want to correct what you said about the newer instrumentation yet I can't go on with out doing it.
Yes the new instrumentation is better then years ago.This I agree with.
You speak about once you have been fused. Well after having fusion surgery of any kind you are not fused yet. This is the reason for having the rods and screws in place. While your body is recovering from having fusion surgery even the newest instrumentation can dislodge and can also break. This is why we are put on restrictions after surgery. It can take months or even more then a year to get a total fusion. In the mean time if the fusion hasn't healed and is not fused all the way the rods can most certainly break. The rods are acting as a internal cast while your fusion fuses,once your fusion is all the way healed then the rods are no longer needed. That is because your fusion has healed and now takes the place of needing the rods. In the mean time the rods can and in some do break. The hard ware doesn't have to be removed however once it is not needed anymore but can be removed if it causes any troubles. There is alot of stress on those rods and untill the fusion is solid there will be restrictions to live by.I just had an appoitment with the doctor to get x-rays as he wanted to make sure nothing was out of place broke or loose.All is well.It has been at least six weeks since I had my surgery and I am fused and roded from T2 TO L4 there would be no way I would be able to even lay on my front.I have a hard time laying on my back. I mostly have to sleep in a recliner. If I even sleep on my back I am so sore in the am and I have a really hard and painfull time getting up.No way could I sleep on my front and get up by myself . This is not about how people sleep more power to the ones who can sleep on there beds front or back or anyway. This was about yes the newer instrumentation can and does break if one doesnt take it easy.
Sorry if this all sounds a bit blunt. Oh by the way my side surgery was the most painfull for me and I was told by the Doc that it was the most serious of the two that I had done. I even ended up back in the hospital one month after surgery because of the side one. My internal stiches didn't dissolve but ripped away from my insides and let me tell you that was more painfull then the surgery itsellf at the time and I was in the hospital another five days because of it. Going threw the chest in any surgery has a very high risk of complications. The spreading of the ribs is very painfull after.There are many risks for this whole surgery side and back and is considered one of the most painfull surgerys out there. I give us all credit for getting threw it.I was like Phill at first and sometimes even now, I wonder what did I get myself into and wish at times I never had it done. Then I think the reason that satisfies me the most is at least I know that it will not continue to get worse as it was progressing at a rapid rate. I was at 107 degrees six weeks before surgery and when I got to surgery it had already progressed to 110 degrees.Anyway I hope you do not have any hard feelings about me dissagreeing with you,but be carefull everyone and lissen to your doctor when he esp..gives you restrictions because yes your instrumentation can break.

zerodegrees
12th January 2006, 10:53 AM
Hi Sally,

Just picked up this thread! You poor thing. Sorry to hear you've been thru the wars again!

My progress seems to have been a bit better smoother than yours. Hows your pain relief? Ru on strong enough painkillers? The only reason I manage to sleep thru the night is probably due to my morphine tablets. I can actually lie on my stomach now though its not the most comfortable position.

I have been refered for physio. The aim is to strengthen the muscles around my spine & abdomen which should provide support & help ease the pain. They are incredibly gentle exercises but should help (along with the walking). Perhaps this might help you. We are both about the same stage (I'm 11 weeks post op). They also gave me some breathing exercises as I had so many problems with my lung following my anterior part of the surgery.

My surgeon said that things dont even really begin knitting together until at least 12 weeks post op which is why they didnt even bother to do an xray at my follow up!

I think it is totally normal to feel like you wish you hadn't had the surgery sometimes. I think we get so excited/worked up before surgery & then once its all over there is this enormous lull complimented by a fair bit of pain. However, it will get better. A lot of people on this site have come thru the other side and are leading perfectly normal lives now. I have some really low days too but I try to set myself some very small goals to achieve & before you know it you'll look back and see the difference.

The main thing is, we're all here for you especially during the crap parts!

Hope this helps & take care.

love john x

mark
12th January 2006, 12:00 PM
Johns right we are all here to help everyone goes through crap times and have sensative issues they perhaps cannot discuss elsewhere.

sally333
14th January 2006, 02:48 AM
Originally posted by zerodegrees@Jan 12 2006, 10:53 AM
Hi Sally,

Just picked up this thread! You poor thing. Sorry to hear you've been thru the wars again!

My progress seems to have been a bit better smoother than yours. Hows your pain relief? Ru on strong enough painkillers? The only reason I manage to sleep thru the night is probably due to my morphine tablets. I can actually lie on my stomach now though its not the most comfortable position.

I have been refered for physio. The aim is to strengthen the muscles around my spine & abdomen which should provide support & help ease the pain. They are incredibly gentle exercises but should help (along with the walking). Perhaps this might help you. We are both about the same stage (I'm 11 weeks post op). They also gave me some breathing exercises as I had so many problems with my lung following my anterior part of the surgery.

My surgeon said that things dont even really begin knitting together until at least 12 weeks post op which is why they didnt even bother to do an xray at my follow up!

I think it is totally normal to feel like you wish you hadn't had the surgery sometimes. I think we get so excited/worked up before surgery & then once its all over there is this enormous lull complimented by a fair bit of pain. However, it will get better. A lot of people on this site have come thru the other side and are leading perfectly normal lives now. I have some really low days too but I try to set myself some very small goals to achieve & before you know it you'll look back and see the difference.

The main thing is, we're all here for you especially during the crap parts!

Hope this helps & take care.

love john x
I am feeling and doing ok now. I am actually only seven weeks and four days post op. I have alot of healing to do before I get to eleven weeks as your self. Ever day there are more improvements. I am also having problems with my lungs. When I was brought into the hospital four weeks after my surgery I had a ct scan and it showed fluid around my lungs. At first they were going to drain it and decided to just watch it. The doctor that wants to just watch it though has never came back and looked at it again. Other then that and the fack that the pain was just horriable when I tore the internal stiches out,I have been having no further troubles.
I wanted to post last time because of what jonny worte about the newer instrumention not breaking. It does break and I was just getting tired of people getting false information given to them. I do agree with jonny that the newer is better.
I am on at this time oxycontin and endocet. I should have been out of my endocet yesterday but I actually had 62 pills left. I went in to get my perscriptions filled and told the doc that I no longer needed the endocet. I also want to ween myself off the oxycontint as I hate to take pills. I was at 80mgs twice a day and now I am taking 60mgs twice a day. I think I might go down to 40mgs in a week I am not sure. The doctor thinks I am trying to get off them to fast as I had such a large surgery.
As with most people who have surgery I think at one time especially when things are not going as expected think why did I go threw with this and then they realize it was a good thing. In my case it had to be done as the pain was to bad and of it progressing so fast. The healing time sucks and I am worried about getting back to work but other then that I am glad that I did have it done.
At first I thought my doctor wanted me in physically thearpy one month after surgery . Now he didnt order it and I dont go back untill three months post op to see him again. So I know I will be unable to return to my job at three months. I hope I can as I do work in a hospital emergency room and the job can be tuff at times. I have done this work for twenty years and feel this is all I have. I just dont want to loose it.
Being as I work in a hospital and now have been in a hospital an affliate to ware I work,it is hard to see how bad the care is there,as I said before if one has to use the call light for any reason one becomes the nurses worst enemy. I would never treat my patients that way. I am embarresed to be apart of the hospital. My surgery I wich could have been done in the hospital ware I work as I now I would have goton better care. The surgery is not done there.
Well anyway all is going well. I still have to sleep on the recliner and ware a brace. The brace I like now at first I hated it. Well everone have a great night.

mark
27th January 2006, 08:31 AM
How are things now Sally ?

Jonny
27th January 2006, 01:02 PM
Originally posted by sally333@Jan 14 2006, 02:48 AM
I wanted to post last time because of what jonny worte about the newer instrumention not breaking. It does break and I was just getting tired of people getting false information given to them. I do agree with jonny that the newer is better.
It's true that modern instrumentation has been subject to far more biomechanical testing (usage data and cadaver testing) than Harrington rods were, plus it is segmental, so not only is less force applied to a small area, it is more able to withstand these forces. It does break, but generally modern instrumentation takes far longer and will not break until long after many spinal fusions have solidified.

The risk of hook and screw pullout is lower as well, but this is still an issue and must be resolved. (I'm going into biomedical engineering, so I could help with that!)

sally333
29th January 2006, 08:58 AM
Originally posted by Jonny+Jan 27 2006, 01:02 PM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (Jonny @ Jan 27 2006, 01:02 PM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-sally333@Jan 14 2006, 02:48 AM
I wanted to post last time because of what jonny worte about the newer instrumention not breaking. It does break and I was just getting tired of people getting false information given to them. I do agree with jonny that the newer is better.
It's true that modern instrumentation has been subject to far more biomechanical testing (usage data and cadaver testing) than Harrington rods were, plus it is segmental, so not only is less force applied to a small area, it is more able to withstand these forces. It does break, but generally modern instrumentation takes far longer and will not break until long after many spinal fusions have solidified.

The risk of hook and screw pullout is lower as well, but this is still an issue and must be resolved. (I'm going into biomedical engineering, so I could help with that!) [/b][/quote]
Well I am much to tired to get into this one.
However one of the reasons for the rods breaking now is that the fusion is not fused yet and if the fusion does not take a solid hold then the rods can absulutely break and that could be the day after surgery or the day or months or year after!If one also puts too much stress on there newer instrumentation then that is another reason why it can break.
This comes out of my surgerons mouth.

Phil
29th January 2006, 11:58 AM
Well I am much to tired to get into this one.
However one of the reasons for the rods breaking now is that the fusion is not fused yet and if the fusion does not take a solid hold then the rods can absolutely break and that could be the day after surgery or the day or months or year after!If one also puts too much stress on there newer instrumentation then that is another reason why it can break.
This comes out of my surgeons mouth.

Its true there is risk of newer rods breaking while the fusion is not yet solid, that risk was also there and alot higher with older rods too. Its not just now.

In reality the only reason a rod should break is when its put under pressure so its extremely unlikely to break straight after surgery while laying down. In any case there are exceptions. Faults and complications etc.

This hardware is designed with experience taking into account the flaws of older instrumentation. Although there are risks of rods breaking and hook pull outs etc, the risk of rod breakage is extremely low therefore Sally and everyone i really would not worry yourself about it, if it happens your surgeons know what they're doing. Jonny can reassure you having been one of the ones to have a hook pull out.

sally333
29th January 2006, 10:32 PM
Originally posted by Phil@Jan 29 2006, 11:58 AM
Well I am much to tired to get into this one.
However one of the reasons for the rods breaking now is that the fusion is not fused yet and if the fusion does not take a solid hold then the rods can absolutely break and that could be the day after surgery or the day or months or year after!If one also puts too much stress on there newer instrumentation then that is another reason why it can break.
This comes out of my surgeons mouth.

Its true there is risk of newer rods breaking while the fusion is not yet solid, that risk was also there and alot higher with older rods too. Its not just now.

In reality the only reason a rod should break is when its put under pressure so its extremely unlikely to break straight after surgery while laying down. In any case there are exceptions. Faults and complications etc.

This hardware is designed with experience taking into account the flaws of older instrumentation. Although there are risks of rods breaking and hook pull outs etc, the risk of rod breakage is extremely low therefore Sally and everyone i really would not worry yourself about it, if it happens your surgeons know what they're doing. Jonny can reassure you having been one of the ones to have a hook pull out.
I agree with you Phil.
I myself would not ever worry about the rods breaking.
I just like the facts to be right.
Thanks for responding.