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gerbo
30th August 2005, 05:16 PM
We have recently found a very experienced physio, who is very keen to work with Laura, specifically looking at assymetries in musclepower between left and right, the theory being that if you address the assymmetries you might have a chance of stopping any worsening of the curve.

This thursday we will be going to see a colleague of him who has developped methods of objectively measuring musclestrength, which he (as I have been told) has used a lot on top sporters he has been working with. Clearly, if we can find "objective" differences, we have something to work with, if not......??????

I am really nervous about this, everytime you try something, or hear of something you could try, there is this glimmer of hope you might be able to make a difference, on the other side, the chance of failure, not achieving anything, and therefore further disillusionment is so real............

I'll let you know what happened after thursday

gerbo

sins
30th August 2005, 05:32 PM
Please do, because I'm very interested to hear about this theory.
My right side is far more muscular and stronger than my left.My left leg is a lot thinner than my right, same with upper arms. If differing muscle power is a factor, then I suspect it involves more than just back muscles.
I wasn't a lazy kid either, I was very strong and athletic so I've been aware of the difference since my teens.
You are 100% right to try this approach for your daughter.At best it may reduce the curve or halt the progression, at worst, it'll make her aware of the importance of keeping her muscle groups strong and flexible and hopefully educate her in back care.
Try not get disillusioned,keep thinking positively.her curve is at the stage where it hasn't rotated too severely and gravity hasn't taken a hold.You have a narrow window of opportunity and it just seems to me that you're maximising her chances of successful non surgical therapy.
Good luck!
Sins

gerbo
30th August 2005, 05:37 PM
thanks, you're kind

gerbo

tonibunny
30th August 2005, 05:53 PM
Good luck Gerbo! I really hope that the physio helps Lissa. At the very least it should help her to keep strong and supple, which can only be a good thing, but it would be amazing if it helped her to prevent the curve from worsening :-)

scoligirl
30th August 2005, 06:38 PM
Good Luck too! It is great you have found a decent physiotherapist. Mine said basically she could not do anything for me as I have no symptoms to treat. But with your daughter being young and still having growth left if does make sense that physio could prevent it getting worse by strengthening/treating the muscles.

Hope it all goes well on Thursday

BeckyH
30th August 2005, 07:04 PM
i think there's a lot in this, and i think it's worked for james blake (the tennis player we're just discussing in the common room)

i'm considering having something like this done when my fusion's solid to try and even my back muscles up and help me get even straighter though i don't know how far i'll get or how much it will do for me. my legs are pretty strong though because i ride, and there's no discrepancy between them (or not a noticeable one anyways)

let us know how you get on!

Lizzie89
30th August 2005, 07:18 PM
Ye ive been told ive got to have physio after im fused - mainly to straighten my top curve. I think i have one leg longer than the other though so i dont know how much it'll help -

I hope this goes well for you Gerbo- all the best :-)

gerbo
2nd September 2005, 04:44 PM
It was interesting, that's for sure, although I don't think it will make a big difference to our current approach

Method used to measure strength in different musclegroups seemed to give quite reliable and consistent results, unfortunately, the most important area, i.e. the muscles round the spine couldn't be measured (yet, he is working on his method though)

Main result was that she is actually very symmetrical in most musclegroups, apart from upper arm and upper leg on the left which were a bit weaker. Whether that means that the muscles in between, i.e. the paraspinal muscles, on the left are weaker as well, I don't know, but we are assuming they are and our approach over the last few months, trying to strengthen these, has been based on this.

So, nothing earthshattering here, so, I suppose it will be just plodding on as before until our next review somewhere midoktober when we will find out whether we are achieving anything.

gerbo

Lizzie89
2nd September 2005, 04:57 PM
Atleat you didnt have any awful news gerbo - Its good that they can measure all of those muscle groups, and that your physio actually seems to care about it. keep your chin up :-)

All the best
:squeeze:

sins
3rd September 2005, 12:04 PM
http://www.ejbjs.org/cgi/content/abstract/...nalcode=jobojos (http://www.ejbjs.org/cgi/content/abstract/76/8/1193?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&fulltext=scoliosis&andorexactfulltext=and&searchid=1125741672237_669&stored_search=&FIRSTINDEX=70&sortspec=relevance&resourcetype=1&journalcode=jobojos)

scoligirl
3rd September 2005, 03:46 PM
I am confused, how do you know if this method works or not? If the curve does not get worse then yes you could say it has helped, but then you not know if it would not have gotten worse anyway if not treated like that. If you understand? Sorry if I am being confusing. I just mean you can't prove it scientifically. Maybe we are all doomed.

Sealy
3rd September 2005, 04:09 PM
Originally posted by scoligirl@Sep 3 2005, 07:46 AM
I am confused, how do you know if this method works or not? If the curve does not get worse then yes you could say it has helped, but then you not know if it would not have gotten worse anyway if not treated like that.
Scoligirl,

Your argument is sometimes put forward by a few highly respected doctors re: bracing and we all know the natural history of untreated progressive scoliosis. What you have to do is focus on yourself or your child and do EVERYTHING you can to help. I try not to get bogged down with statistics :D


Edit: If the same doctors who make these statements want to play something that's akin to russian roulette with their OWN kids, go right ahead ! O.K. I'm in one of these moods this morning.... :soapbox:

scoligirl
3rd September 2005, 04:31 PM
I just hope Gerbos daughter doesn't get depressed about her body having to go to all these sessions and feeling like there is something wrong with her that can't be treated. And being bogged down by having all these treatments like a brace, and training everday to strenghthen the muscles. It will be a lot a hard work if the aim is to cure her curve.

(I am such a hypocrit anyway! I am in a strange mood today! I know I have no experience of any of this to comment, as I was told I can't be treated. Maybe I do wish something more could be done for people like me who don't need surgery, and others who do. Just the phrases "glimmer of hope" and failure stuf makes it sound like scoliosis is an awful awful thing to have which means you are never going to have a normal life. Don't blame me if you don't like what I say. I am just here to comment.)

Sealy
3rd September 2005, 04:36 PM
Scoligirl,

What degree curve do you have again ? Don't worry about your comments, I'm in one of those moods too.... :-D Actually, I applaud Gerbo ! What he's doing is absolutely fantastic ! His daughter is right in the middle of the adolescent growth spurt and he's doing everything within his power to contain the progression and hopefully get some correction. A few years from now when the growth spurt is over, his daughter will be able to discard the brace. If she can avoid surgery, her future will be so much better and I'm sure she will thank him a million times over !

Lizzie89
3rd September 2005, 05:01 PM
Amen - well done Gerbo ;-)

sins
3rd September 2005, 05:37 PM
Scoligirl,
your opinion is every bit as valid as everyone else's here.
I acknowledge you've been told nothing can be done for you.It seems that people with mild scoliosis are thrown to one side as Leona can testify and are left to their own devices.It's really only if you need a brace or a surgery that the system admits you.
We don't know if this physiotherapy will work for Gerbo's daughter, but the reasoning behind it is very logical.It's worth a try.
I wish my parents had been even 1% as committed as He is.Many of us here wish our parents had done more.....heck some of us wish our parents had even done ANYTHING.In an 11 year old girl a 29 degree curve can quickly become a 69 deg curve throughout the teen growth phase. I'm sure she's fed up sometimes but at least when she's grown up and looks back she'll acknowledge that her parents did their absolute best for her.As a parent it's devastating to think that your child has any medical defect.
Last year we met the nursing director of a major orthopaedic hospital over here who was adamant about the benefits of physiotherapy for adults with smaller curves.
Just because the NHS doesn't recognise minor curves as being worthy of attention unless they cause severe pain, doesn't mean that you shouldn't try and find an answer for yourself.
You are NOT a hypocrite.And never feel worried about expressing yourself on this site.We all understand.
Sins
:squeeze: :squeeze:

gerbo
4th September 2005, 08:28 PM
Originally posted by scoligirl@Sep 3 2005, 01:46 PM
I am confused, how do you know if this method works or not? If the curve does not get worse then yes you could say it has helped, but then you not know if it would not have gotten worse anyway if not treated like that.
Absolute valid comments

gerbo
4th September 2005, 08:43 PM
Originally posted by scoligirl@Sep 3 2005, 02:31 PM
I just hope Gerbos daughter doesn't get depressed about her body having to go to all these sessions and feeling like there is something wrong with her that can't be treated. And being bogged down by having all these treatments like a brace, and training everday to strenghthen the muscles. It will be a lot a hard work if the aim is to cure her curve.


Again, valid comments, and I have no objection to them at all. Specially in the beginning of the whole proces, when we were just diagnosed and feeling our way around treatment options, she would get very annoyed with us when we took her to somebody else again, (in order; she has seen; physiotherapist 1, orthopeed1, other ortho peed2, my brother (who is a physio2) a friend of my brother (who is a physio3) , an ortho tist, a physio4, a chiropracter (she was a joke!!), another physio 5, our current physio6, the gym, our latest trip and i am sure i might have forgotten one or two.) We have calmed down though and have at least a sense of direction, whether that will get us where we want to be?

You know, in a way you know exactly what you got, you are past the stage that significant worsening is likely (I assume) , and in a way it is a bit easier for you to look at yourself saying; yeah, quite happy with myself, not a big deal this scoliosis. It is different for us, anything could happen still with Laura and the prospect of significant worsening of the curve with all the discomfort this can cause is something we do not want to contemplate (yet)

keep commenting though, as it is good to look at this from all possible angles :-) :-)

gerbo

BeckyH
4th September 2005, 09:19 PM
ok you asked for a comment :D

i know you've sought a lot of advice about this (you've certainly been through a few physios!) and are trying to get the best treatment possible, but how high impact are the exercises she has to do?

the reason i ask is when i was at school (only a couple of years ago) a professional fitness instructor and all the PE teachers told us we mustn't start going to gyms and doing weights until we were at least 18 (and maybe even hold off a little longer) as due to the fact that we were still growing (and after you're skeletally mature, muscles etc still develop) we could do ourselves a bit of damage. the other place i've heard this from is in the case of sports players - if people play seriously in the junior version of their sport with a real aim to do it professionally, they still don't do a serious amount of conditioning or weight training until at the very least they've stopped growing upwards.

i guess my point here is - is there a special set of "safe" exercises which help to even out a young child's muscles and lessen a scoliosis (i know you must have to work quite hard, muscles and bones are tough for a reason and straightening them out isn't easy)

i'm not trying to knock your approach or treatment plan, i'm more curious than anything

gerbo
4th September 2005, 10:14 PM
Originally posted by marmyte@Sep 4 2005, 07:19 PM

i guess my point here is - is there a special set of "safe" exercises which help to even out a young child's muscles and lessen a scoliosis (i know you must have to work quite hard, muscles and bones are tough for a reason and straightening them out isn't easy)


How do we know it is safe what we are doing?

Basically by being very cautious and asking relevant professionals before we started. Actually 2/3 of what we are doing is basic stuff i.e lots of swimming (with the idea of generally getting stronger and flexible) and a set of symmetric exercises of the back muscles in order to get them more "activated", this is currently all we are doing with our current physio, (with whom we have only started recently)

the more adventurous bit is based on work by an american physician some years ago (Vert Mooney) who used resistance equipment (torsorotation), slowly increasing resistance over 6 months, to equalise out previous assymmetrical EMG output from the paravertebral muscles. He had reasonable results in his admittingly small sample of patients (majority stabilised or even improved, and that is without additional bracing) and his work has been quoted in various places as "promising". Although retired now himself, I am aware of others doing similar studies (to see if they can replicate the results)

Before we started doing this ourselves (having spend many weeks trying to locate a machine doing a similar job as the one used in his study, only to find it in our very local gym) i checked ofcourse with our orthopedic surgeon, who was entirely happy (but sceptical) for us to try this.

My "working theory" is: Assymetrical muscle strength around the spine contributes to curvature, which in a "vicious cycle" gets worse and worse to a point of "no return" when more structural changes prevent much improvement through whatever treatment. We are trying to break the cycle by forcing the spine straighter through the brace (although not as much as I would like to see) and evening out the supporting structures, giving the spine a better chance of staying straight "ish".

I know very well that it might all be absolute rubbish, but up till now this has felt to me as the most logical approach.

One can only try.......

Gerbo

andrea
4th September 2005, 10:17 PM
Becky

Your comment made me think. Reading all the forums and sites that I do, I seem to have come across a lot of youngsters who are really into gymnastics developing juvenile scoliosis. I'm not suggesting it is the cause by any means, but your comments about high level exercises made me think. I know gymnasts do a lot of weight training and physical training at a very young age (IMO) and I wonder if there is any kind of link.

Just thinking out loud really. I'd thought previously how it was quite amazing how many scoli kids did gymnastics. Perhaps it's just a popular sport? Probably.

A

BeckyH
4th September 2005, 10:18 PM
yeah makes sense. i understand more now, thanks.

just to deviate slightly, i'm curious about your ideas on bracing and i know we've talked about it before, but: how do you think it can be more aggressive? short of being in a correctly fitting, fully tightened brace 23 hours a day (which i would have thought is what most surgeons would recommend for a patient like your daughter), how much more aggressive can it be?

oops repeated myself a bit there. i think you're doing everything you can, i can't see how you can improve! i'm amazed, have a medal

BeckyH
4th September 2005, 10:23 PM
yes it could just be a coincidence. a girl i knew at 6th form in my first year said she had been to an osteopath and her GP and they both thought scoliosis was caused by horseriding. i said that's...ok i won't use the exact word but it was rude what i said :D anyways, i thought that was rubbish because knowing about riding i couldn't see how that worked plus there are a LOT of people who ride, and if riding causes scoliosis, why aren't orthopaedic spinal specialists even busier?

this is the problem with scoliosis, it's so hard to establish hardcore links. it's like cracking an impossible code grr

tonibunny
4th September 2005, 10:38 PM
Originally posted by andrea@Sep 4 2005, 08:17 PM
I'd thought previously how it was quite amazing how many scoli kids did gymnastics. Perhaps it's just a popular sport? Probably.

A
I wonder if this is because lots of people with scoliosis tend to have very flexible joints (remember the bendy-finger tests we did a while back?), and flexibility is a great asset to have when doing gymnastics?

So, rather than gymnastics making kids more likely to end up with scoliosis, I reckon that children with flexible joints are more likely to be natural gymnasts, and would want to take up gymnastics as a hobby.

gerbo
4th September 2005, 10:40 PM
Originally posted by andrea@Sep 4 2005, 08:17 PM
Just thinking out loud really. I'd thought previously how it was quite amazing how many scoli kids did gymnastics
and dancers, and swimmers, and tennisplayers (I think), is it the activity which put you at risk??, is the kind of person liking (and being good at) that kind of activity at risk.?? Is it just noted more because of the nature of the activity, paying so much attention to the body ??(I don't think Laura would have been picked up if she wasn't dancing so much)

questions :???: :???: :???:

gerbo

BeckyH
4th September 2005, 10:44 PM
it's nothing short of a miracle that my mum noticed my scoliosis, i wasn't exactly an exhibitionist at that point and schools don't check you for it (plus i've always been healthy and haven't needed to go to a GP for any other random bug or such) my children (should i have any) will spend more time bent forward so i can check their spines than they will be upright. i'll probably give them postural scoliosis! :D

gerbo
4th September 2005, 10:53 PM
Originally posted by marmyte@Sep 4 2005, 08:18 PM
i'm curious about your ideas on bracing and i know we've talked about it before, but: how do you think it can be more aggressive? short of being in a correctly fitting,
A german forum I looked at (I just about can read german) was very negative about british bracing, virtually describing it as useless and telling me that a properly made brace could achieve 100% correction (whilst in the brace, note, this doesn't mean 100% cure). Many guidelines indicate that a 50% initial correction needs to be achieved for the bracing to have a chance of succes. (we had 25% correction)

If this is all true then it must be down to the skills of the orthotist and the kind of brace which is being used.

Might be all pie in the sky and I dread to think what the price in discomfort is, the wearer might have to pay. But then, what is the use of a comfortable brace which doesn't work???

Just out of interest, the shining successtory on that forum seems to be one of the moderators whose scoliosis of about 50 degree was (permanently) reduced to about 30 degree by her brace (forgotten the exact figures),

How realistic is all this, I don't know, at least they are much more positive (and interested) about bracing as a real option there rather then the UK medical attitude which seems to regard a brace just a s a bit of a holding exercise prior to inevitable surgery (at least that is what I sensed from our consultant)

I know going a bit OTT here, but at least you get the idea a bit

best wishes

gerbo

BeckyH
4th September 2005, 11:03 PM
gerbo i have a couple of great pictures of my xrays of me in my brace, one of them is in the gallery but the xray where the brace seems to be working better isn't. if you have msn, add me and i'll happily send you the file. it may not be that that site has the correct opinion on british bracing, and it may be more to do with the individual orthotist, not the uk as a whole. but anyways, i'm happy with the way my brace worked...i'm sure you've considered seeing another orthotist if you're not happy?

tonibunny
4th September 2005, 11:05 PM
I'm not convinced that even the most well-crafted brace could achieve 100% correction in absolutely everyone. For instance, my own thoracic curve was noted to have been "very stiff and difficult to straighten" during my first surgery when I was ten. The best correction they could get for me was to about 45 degrees, down from about 75 degrees. If that's the best they could do during surgery, it's safe to say that even the most agressive bracing couldn't have corrected it more.

Then again, that surgery was back in 1986. The braces and casts I had for the first ten years of my life were simply intended to hold my curves and prevent them from deteriorating, and it's a known fact that curves stiffen up and become inflexible with age.

sins
4th September 2005, 11:45 PM
I'm not convinced that even the most well-crafted brace could achieve 100% correction in absolutely everyone.
Believe it or not my medical records show that my milwaulkee brace did in fact achieve 100% correction when I was 8.Problem was that it was prescribed to be worn for 12 hrs a day.However it was virtually intolerable to wear.30 yrs later I can still feel the bruising burning pain.....it stretched my neck like a giraffe and held it totally in extension.
Gerbo,if my 8 yr old daughter develops scoliosis, I will do precisely what you are doing. Your logic is sound and you are making sure she complies with the best that conventional bracing can offer while at the same time exploring therapies which may assist in the reduction of the curve.

Sealy
5th September 2005, 02:54 AM
Originally posted by tonibunny@Sep 4 2005, 03:05 PM
For instance, my own thoracic curve was noted to have been "very stiff and difficult to straighten" during my first surgery when I was ten. The best correction they could get for me was to about 45 degrees, down from about 75 degrees. If that's the best they could do during surgery, it's safe to say that even the most agressive bracing couldn't have corrected it more.


Not all children are blessed with flexible curves, some curves are a little more stubborn - that's just the nature of the beast. :( Toni, I think your curve was rigid to begin with and became more rigid with time - I think Mr. Edgar did everything within his power to get you straight. AIS is different since the deformity is usually not a long standing one and hence the curve is more flexible. I think Gerbo is right to question the fact that his daughter is only getting 25% correction with the brace. Gerbo, you can probably find out exactly how flexible your daughter's curve is by requesting a bending x-ray - this will give you an idea.

tonibunny
5th September 2005, 03:27 AM
I agree Sealy. 25% does not seem at all satisfactory :(

My point is that the German chaps on the forum Gerbo had been to seemed to give the impression that, if "properly constructed", a brace could achieve 100% correction in most if not all cases - and that is simply misleading.

Excellent point about the bending x-rays by the way. Gerbo, you should certainly look into having those done.

gerbo
5th September 2005, 12:40 PM
Ofcourse, nothing is entirely straightforward, the 25% correction was with the brace straps at the "recommended" thightness, since then, we have found that often we can tighten up much more, whether that means we have more correction at that stage, we don't know.??? :???:

The bending x rays seems like a good idea, this must be lateral bending i suppose? :???:

My only worry is, with how many xrays we are going to end up

1)normal staight x ray out of brace to determine progression or improvement
2) bending xray as suggested
3) if she gets a new brace; a further x ray to check effectiveness

Any information about radiation load this would give?? :???:

Re "german bracing"; it wasn't really 100% in all cases and definitely not if spine had lost its flexibility, however, in younger flexible spine 100% or even overcorrection was said to be technically possible, but as so much in this rotten game; no rule applies to everybody.

Thanks for everybody thinking with me

appreciated a lot :niceone: :niceone: :niceone:

scoligirl
5th September 2005, 01:05 PM
Sounds like you are doing well! Silly me thought you had decided not to have a brace and do the exercise programme instead! Combining the two sounds like the best course of treatment.

About the x rays, I suppose if she needs them what can you do! I have read on another forum about people having had 100 or more throughout their life because of monitoring scoliosis, and have had no health scares due to them.

BeckyH
5th September 2005, 06:02 PM
i don't think the radiation is dangerous. i know Laura is only young but to give you an idea, in four and a half years, i've had 16 xrays (8 of those within a week whilst in hospital) and an MRI. but that's just my opinion and i'm no doctor.

if your ortho is anything like mine, once her growing slows (around 15/16) he'll ask to only see her anually, mine actually said "so you don't start glowing in the dark" though he was joking with that. so they are concerned and do take it into consideration

sins
7th September 2005, 09:53 PM
Gerbo, Have you seen this site?
Sins
http://www.bostonbrace.com/

Joy
8th September 2005, 05:33 AM
We do weight training at school and I'm only 16. I think as long as you do it correctly and do not lift anything too heavy (put the emphasis on edurance rather than strength) then it is OK to lift weights as a teenager. I don't know for sure though!

I wouldn't worry about the radiation, they have good measure now (like radiation screens) to protect kids. As long as the x-rays are being taking PA (her back to the x-ray machine, her front to the film), she should be fine. They should do PA as opposed to AP to minimize the radiation breast tissue is exposed to. At least that is what I've been told.

titch
8th September 2005, 10:07 AM
It's true that they should, but getting them to do it across here is a different matter entirely :soapbox:

andrea
8th September 2005, 01:19 PM
This is true. All our xrays to date have been AP. I don't really think about the radiation side of things as in our case there is no alternative to having an xray. I know they won't do them unnecessarily and take all the precautions they can, ie lead aprons around the waist.

Lizzie89
8th September 2005, 10:25 PM
I had problems with a Lead apron in Stanmore just aftr my op when both my hips were numb - oh dear we did have some problems - i feel sorry for the radiographer - everytime he got to his box my lil apron would fall off heehee.

Anyway i really hope this works for Laura, how old is she by the way?
Just curious :-)

BeckyH
8th September 2005, 11:00 PM
every xray i've ever had has been back to the film, front to the machine :-? and yeah i had lead aprons for the ones at stanmore but that's only 6 out of 16!

scoligirl
8th September 2005, 11:24 PM
Wo now i am worried about my x ray, I know it was only once, but i just lay on the table and the lady moved a box thing above me (So does that mean I was facing it so my breast tissue was exposed? And I just had to wear one of those hospital apron not a lead one just fabric!)

It is good you brought this topic up. If I need an x ray in the future I will be sure to ask questions about how it works.

gerbo
9th September 2005, 09:11 AM
Originally posted by Lizzie89@Sep 8 2005, 08:25 PM
Laura, how old is she by the way?
Just curious :-)
11 (and a half) going on 16

gerbo

titch
9th September 2005, 09:19 AM
You should also ensure that any future xrays are done while standing - while it probably doesn't make much difference, they should ideally not be done lying down. Also make sure that the tech doesn't push you here, pull you there, adjust your shoulders and mangle your hips around in an effort to get you straight! I've had quite a lot of them do this to me, and when I tell them to stop it, because the whole idea is to get an accurate picture of my posture and curvatures, some of them get it, but others just look utterly blank :rant:

BeckyH
9th September 2005, 08:09 PM
Originally posted by gerbo+Sep 9 2005, 07:11 AM--></div><table border='0' align='center' width='95%' cellpadding='3' cellspacing='1'><tr><td>QUOTE (gerbo @ Sep 9 2005, 07:11 AM)</td></tr><tr><td id='QUOTE'> <!--QuoteBegin-Lizzie89@Sep 8 2005, 08:25 PM
Laura, how old is she by the way?
Just curious :-)
11 (and a half) going on 16

gerbo [/b][/quote]
ah that sounds familiar :D

yikes - i don't know if i have the guts to ask a radiographer if i can stand with my back to the machine. i've had so many over the last four and a half years and every single one has said stand with my back to the wall...

what's a "safe" amount of xrays over a person's lifetime, or does such a thing not exist?

newgirl
9th September 2005, 09:48 PM
Obviously there is no knowing what a safe limit of radiation exposure over a lifetime is because there are many more contributary factors to radiation exposure than having medical x-rays. For example air travel is a huge contrtibution to some peoples overall exposure to radiation and that is one of the reason that air crew's flying time is so regulated.
This site gives a fairly simplified overview of average exposures, I am not too sure how old the information is so some regulations may have changed but it will give you an idea of relative exposures.
http://rehs.rutgers.edu/online_training/xray_train/Five.html
HTH
Nicola

sins
9th September 2005, 11:09 PM
I would rather my daughter have ten x rays in ayear than have her smoke cigarettes for a year.
I'm one of those people with the 100 plus x rays, many taken in the mid seventies/early eighties when radiation levels were higher than now with the older machines.Still no illl effects apparent.

tonibunny
10th September 2005, 08:11 AM
Like Sins, I've had at least 100 x-rays, taken throughout my childhood from 1976 onwards.....and have had no ill effects whatsoever :-)

I got concerned about this a few years back and asked my consultant whether I should be worried - I was particularly worried in case it had an effect on fertility. I was told that no, there are no recorded cases of any people who were treated as kids at the RNOH who have ended up ill because of multiple x-rays, and even kiddies treated with high doses of radiation at the specialist bone cancer centre there have gone on to lead healthy lives and have children of their own! So I am not worried at all now :D

Lizzie89
10th September 2005, 10:17 AM
oh thats nice to know. I was getting a little anxious :-)

Gerbo wish Laura well for me - i found my scoliosis at 14, it must be so hard coping with it at a younger age, as i know alot of you have.

nuttynatalie
27th October 2005, 04:14 PM
Goodluck!
I have physio although i had the op in feb, since i had the brace off in aug i started having hydrotherapy and it's going quite good and i can feel its doing something and being effective i think by the aches i get after it! But goodluck, though it'll be good to find out about his theory!